medical cannabis – Remedii http://remedii.net/ Sat, 19 Mar 2022 05:25:52 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://remedii.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2-150x150.png medical cannabis – Remedii http://remedii.net/ 32 32 New Mexico gears up for recreational cannabis sales | Local News https://remedii.net/new-mexico-gears-up-for-recreational-cannabis-sales-local-news/ Sat, 19 Mar 2022 05:25:52 +0000 https://remedii.net/new-mexico-gears-up-for-recreational-cannabis-sales-local-news/ A state agency tasked with overseeing New Mexico’s new market for legal cannabis sales is ready to launch the industry on April 1, its top official said. Yes, it’s April Fool’s Day. But the booming cannabis retail business for adults 21 and older is no joke. Hundreds of businesses are gearing up for the day […]]]>

A state agency tasked with overseeing New Mexico’s new market for legal cannabis sales is ready to launch the industry on April 1, its top official said.

Yes, it’s April Fool’s Day.

But the booming cannabis retail business for adults 21 and older is no joke. Hundreds of businesses are gearing up for the day by setting up shops and stocking up. There will likely be streamers and balloons.

“We really expect this first day of activity to be filled with excitement,” said Kristen Thomson, director of the Cannabis Control Division of the New Mexico Department of Regulation and Licensing.

Members of his agency, which plans to double the number of its employees from 12 to 24 to provide better support for cannabis businesses and close oversight, will hit the streets on April 1.

Thomson declined to say where its employees will be or what they will be doing; she jokingly called it a “trade secret”.

While some business owners, advocates and potential cannabis store customers have expressed concerns about supplies holding up in the early days of legal sales, Thomson said she’s confident cannabis growers have enough products to supply stores.

“We’re not worried about the lack of product,” she said. “As with any new gadget or restaurant or anything that opens, some product may be missing, but we don’t anticipate a massive statewide shortage of product on opening day.”

It remains unclear how many stores will open on April 1 for recreational cannabis sales, in addition to medical cannabis retailers, some of which have been operating for years. The state has approved more than 225 cannabis retail licenses, including numerous integrated licenses for businesses that produce, manufacture, deliver, and sell cannabis products.

Thomson said some of these licenses cover more than one commercial site.

But, she added, many retailers could still follow local zoning guidelines and wait for a municipality’s approval to open.

It has been legal to use cannabis products in the state since late June, but many consumers are also looking forward to the day when they can walk into a local store and buy products legally.

Emily Kaltenbach, senior state director of the nonprofit National Drug Policy Alliance, which helped draft legislation legalizing adult cannabis sales, said state officials have done ” a lot of work” to prepare for a successful launch on April 1, but there is still some uncertainty.

Although state law requires retailers to set aside 20% of their products for patients under the state’s medical cannabis program, she said patients may be ‘more concerned’ about the lack of supplies. than recreational users. Nearly 132,000 New Mexicans had signed up for the medical cannabis program as of February, according to the state Department of Health.

Retailers are doing their best to prepare. Josh Foley, who runs a Pecos Valley Production cannabis store in Albuquerque, said his company is trying to stock up to $500,000 worth of product “to get us through the first two months” of retail.

He thinks a shortage could occur within a few months.

Duke Rodriguez, president and CEO of New Mexico Top Organics-Ultra Health, the state’s largest medical cannabis operation, predicted big trouble down the line. He noted that the state caps plant production at 20,000 per grower while allowing unlimited retail licenses.

Within a year, he said, “we’ll probably have to reduce up to 100 locations, and there will be a lot of small businesses that will be hit very hard.”

Arizona, with a population of more than 7 million — more than three times that of New Mexico — began retail sales in January 2021 with just about 75 dispensaries. Recent media reports indicate that Arizona made approximately $1.4 billion in industry-related revenue in less than a year.

Ben Lewinger, executive director of the New Mexico Cannabis Chamber of Commerce, disagrees with Rodriguez’s concerns. Allowing anyone eligible to open a cannabis store ensures fairness for those who wish to purchase what should be a major economic and employment driver in the state, he said: “This is the American dream.”

Lewinger and Kaltenbach expressed optimism about the state’s ability to work out the “hiccups and bumps” over time, as other states did after cannabis legalization.

As for April Foley, Foley is preparing for, well, anything to happen.

When asked how many customers he was expecting that day, he replied, “I have no idea. I wouldn’t be surprised if 300 people came that day. I wouldn’t be surprised if 50 people came that day.

“It’s kind of a toss-up,” he added. “But we are ready.”

]]>
Cottell: Cannabis Bill Raises Serious Legal Issues | Workers Compensation News https://remedii.net/cottell-cannabis-bill-raises-serious-legal-issues-workers-compensation-news/ Fri, 18 Mar 2022 07:05:52 +0000 https://remedii.net/cottell-cannabis-bill-raises-serious-legal-issues-workers-compensation-news/ By Jennifer A. Cotell Friday, March 18, 2022 | 0 The New Jersey Assembly recently introduced legislation, A3511, that would require all workers’ compensation insurers, personal injury insurers, and health insurance carriers carrying insurance in New Jersey to provide coverage for medical cannabis. This legislation goes too far in the contractual negotiation between consumers and […]]]>

By Jennifer A. Cotell

Friday, March 18, 2022 | 0

The New Jersey Assembly recently introduced legislation, A3511, that would require all workers’ compensation insurers, personal injury insurers, and health insurance carriers carrying insurance in New Jersey to provide coverage for medical cannabis. This legislation goes too far in the contractual negotiation between consumers and insurance companies and will undoubtedly lead to higher premium costs.

Jennifer A. Cotell

The legislation appears to be an attempt to codify and extend the decision in Hager v. M&K Construction.

Readers may recall that a nearly identical bill, A1708, passed the New Jersey Assembly Appropriations Committee on October 26, 2020, while Hager was scheduled to be heard by the New Jersey Supreme Court. Jersey. Subsequently, the Supreme Court in Hager upheld the Appellate Division’s decision to require the workers’ compensation agency to provide medical marijuana as reasonable and necessary medical treatment. given the facts of this particular case.

If this new bill passes, employers and their carriers will have to include coverage for the medical use of cannabis, the use and sale of which is currently prohibited by federal law. The relevant part of the proposed bill reads as follows: “Notwithstanding the provisions of paragraph a. of this section, an employer or a workers’ compensation insurance company or a passenger car insurance company must provide coverage for the costs associated with the medical use of cannabis.

The bill is confusing because it presupposes that the use of medical marijuana is a common and historically accepted type of medical treatment, when in fact it remains highly controversial. Many pain doctors still have reservations about using medical marijuana as a safe alternative to other more historic treatments. Some do not believe that there is sufficient evidence that the use of medical marijuana reduces opiate addiction. This was a significant fact in the Hager case because Mr. Hager testified that marijuana helped him withdraw from opiates.

Even if this bill were to become law, defense counsel will still raise the question in individual cases whether the use of medical marijuana is “reasonable and necessary,” core language of NJSA 35:15-15 . Physician discretion in assessing the reasonableness of medical treatment is critical, since two injured workers may have the same injury, but one may require different treatment to restore function. ‘organization.

Enacting a law requiring carriers to include coverage for a controversial medical treatment will not only increase insurance costs for all employers and taxpayers, but will likely lead to new litigation.

Jennifer A. Cottell is an attorney and shareholder of Capehart Scatchard, a New Jersey defense law firm. This post appears courtesy of the New Jersey Workers Comp blog.

]]>
Cheektowaga store owner accused of offering cannabis with purchase of stickers charged https://remedii.net/cheektowaga-store-owner-accused-of-offering-cannabis-with-purchase-of-stickers-charged/ Mon, 14 Mar 2022 21:07:00 +0000 https://remedii.net/cheektowaga-store-owner-accused-of-offering-cannabis-with-purchase-of-stickers-charged/ CHEEKTOWAGA, NY (WKBW) – A Cheektowaga store owner accused of gifting cannabis with the purchase of stickers was arraigned Monday in Cheektowaga City Court. The Erie County District Attorney’s Office announced that David A. Zale, Jr., 29, of the City of Lancaster, was arraigned in Cheektowaga City Court on one count of criminal possession of […]]]>

CHEEKTOWAGA, NY (WKBW) – A Cheektowaga store owner accused of gifting cannabis with the purchase of stickers was arraigned Monday in Cheektowaga City Court.

The Erie County District Attorney’s Office announced that David A. Zale, Jr., 29, of the City of Lancaster, was arraigned in Cheektowaga City Court on one count of criminal possession of cannabis in the first degree, one count of criminal possession of cannabis. in the second degree and one count of criminal possession of a counterfeit instrument in the second degree.

The district attorney’s office said police executed a search warrant at Zale’s “Shake N’ Daze Green Vision Wellness” business on French Road on February 4 and recovered approximately 15 pounds of cannabis, more than 2 concentrated cannabis books and products that allegedly had fraudulent medical cannabis labels.

Police told 7 News in February that the search warrant was executed after an undercover detective managed to acquire cannabis products by buying a sticker and receiving the products in return.

“Society doesn’t accept this. It’s not a safe way to sell a drug, and it shouldn’t happen, so we’re going to try to stop it,” Cheektowaga Police Chief said. Brian Gould, in February. interview with 7 News.

According to the district attorney’s office, Zale also appeared in court for an ongoing domestic violence case. He is accused of breaking a flowerpot inside the victim’s apartment during a domestic dispute. He faces one count of fourth-degree criminal mischief.

He is due to return to both cases on May 6 and was released on his own recognizance as the charges are not eligible for bail. If convicted on all counts, he faces a maximum of seven years in prison.

]]>
Personal experiences guide men in the medical cannabis business | State and Region https://remedii.net/personal-experiences-guide-men-in-the-medical-cannabis-business-state-and-region/ Mon, 14 Mar 2022 05:01:08 +0000 https://remedii.net/personal-experiences-guide-men-in-the-medical-cannabis-business-state-and-region/ RAPID CITY, SD (AP) — Nevada Ellison wants to keep a promise he made to his mother who died of cancer in 2015. Ellison worked in the cannabis industry in Colorado from 2008 to 2012 before returning to Rapid City. When his mother, Susie, was in what turned out to be the last three months […]]]>

RAPID CITY, SD (AP) — Nevada Ellison wants to keep a promise he made to his mother who died of cancer in 2015.

Ellison worked in the cannabis industry in Colorado from 2008 to 2012 before returning to Rapid City. When his mother, Susie, was in what turned out to be the last three months of her life, she called and asked her son for cannabis edibles.

“She was always anti-cannabis,” Ellison said. “She’s never broken the law in her entire life and she called me. She was taking hundreds of milligrams of oxycodone every day. She’s like, ‘I can’t do this anymore.’ … It broke his heart to break the law.

A week later, she called back and asked for more edibles, noting that she was now better able to take care of herself. Ellison cared for her mother for 16 months in Lemmon until her death. Before doing so, Susie made her son promise that he would get back into the marijuana business, the Rapid City Journal reported.

People also read…

“She made me promise that if I had a chance to get back into it, especially on the medical side, I would, and that’s why I’m getting back into it,” he said. declared.

Ellison is now COO of Black Hills Cannabis Care, which is Rapid City’s first cultivation business approved for a conditional use permit by the city’s Planning Commission.

Ellison runs the company with Jake Johnson, who is the company’s CEO.

Johnson got into the business because he has an uncle who was recently diagnosed with colon cancer and relies on medical marijuana to help manage his pain.

“He knows his time is running out,” Johnson said.

He said he had friends in the industry and had heard of the medicinal benefits of cannabis and believed in those benefits.

“Knowing that and (Ellison’s) history, we thought it was the right thing to do, to try and bring the best quality of medicine to the people of the city,” he said. .

The grow facility will have four to eight employees, but it will not be open to the public. It will be located at 1820 Rand Road on the northwest side of Rapid City off Deadwood Avenue. Ellison said the business will open as soon as the state grants a license.

“We are trying to get a crop up and running as quickly as possible to help meet our regional patient demand for medical cannabis and give them safe access to their medications,” he said. “Until we put in cultures, the dispensaries won’t have anything to sell, so we’re working hard to achieve that.”

Medical cannabis cultivation facilities in Rapid City require a conditional use permit to operate. To be eligible, applicants must show that their facility is at least 1,000 feet from any school and 500 feet from any church, daycare, public park, or residential area. Facilities should be located in heavy or light industrial areas. The city has not set a limit on the number of grow facilities within the city limits.

Johnson said he and Ellison have been preparing for the company since November 2020, when voters overwhelmingly approved of medical marijuana and have since spent nearly every day on the phone preparing everything to apply for their state licenses. and municipalities.

Ellison said every city and county has different rules. Rapid City’s application included submission of plans for management, operations, safety, engineering and tracking from seed to sale.

Black Hills Cannabis Care also plans to have dispensaries in Fort Pierre and Belle Fourche, although the Belle Fourche location is listed under Redwater Cannabis Care. The company also has a provisional license for a dispensary in Rapid City. Ellison said they also plan to have a manufacturing facility.

“Patients need to have a fairly wide variety of products to choose from,” Ellison said. “We’re teaming up with other locals or people in South Dakota and trying to create a network of people who are going to be in the manufacturing so that we can get these products flowing across the state and have high quality and a wide variety.”

Johnson said those in the industry have a common goal of moving the industry forward, so even though they have competitors, they share information. They will work with Black Hills Cultivation and Supplies to get their equipment.

For additional copyright information, see the distributor of this article, Rapid City Journal.

You must be logged in to react.
Click on any reaction to connect.

]]>
Wisconsin Legislature moves toward legalizing recreational cannabis The Badger Herald https://remedii.net/wisconsin-legislature-moves-toward-legalizing-recreational-cannabis-the-badger-herald/ Thu, 10 Mar 2022 01:21:00 +0000 https://remedii.net/wisconsin-legislature-moves-toward-legalizing-recreational-cannabis-the-badger-herald/ 61 percent of Wisconsin residents support the legalization of cannabis, the drug is legal in two neighboring countries States and decriminalized in Madison. Still, it will be difficult to legalize recreational marijuana at the state level — although Wisconsin is moving in that direction, Wisconsin Assembly Leader Rep. Jim Steineke, R-Kaukauna, said Monday. . Cannabis […]]]>

61 percent of Wisconsin residents support the legalization of cannabis, the drug is legal in two neighboring countries States and decriminalized in Madison.

Still, it will be difficult to legalize recreational marijuana at the state level — although Wisconsin is moving in that direction, Wisconsin Assembly Leader Rep. Jim Steineke, R-Kaukauna, said Monday. .

Cannabis legalization is receiving growing bipartisan support in Wisconsin. In 2021, Governor Tony Evers and Senator Melissa Agard D-Madison has separately proposed legalizing marijuana in Wisconsin.

In January 2022, Republicans in Wisconsin proposed legalizing the medical use of cannabis. Proponents of marijuana legalization cite economic benefits and a safer market for users in their argument.

But if Wisconsin legalizes cannabis, it will be difficult for the state to create quality control measures because the United States does not have national standards on cannabis consumption, said Natalie Schmitz, professor of pharmacology at the University of Wisconsin and a researcher in medicinal cannabinoids.

“It’s important to be transparent and specific with what’s in these different products,” Schmitz said.

The lab report: Alternative solutions for natural products based on plant tissuesEditor’s Note: The Lab Report is a weekly series in the print edition of the Badger Herald where we examine in depth Read…

Cannabis plants can contain different types of cannabinoids, and how those cannabinoids affect patients can vary, Schmitz said. This can be dangerous for patients who acquire cannabis without the direction and supervision of a physician, Schmitz said.

Schmitz said she supports Wisconsin passing a law legalizing marijuana for medical purposes, provided the legislation also includes policies on its safe use — such as requiring pharmacists to oversee dispensing or educate patients about side effects.

“I think it’s important that we have quality products and that patients can use them safely under the guidance of a healthcare professional,” Schmitz said.

]]>
More than half of Wisconsin residents want legal cannabis: poll https://remedii.net/more-than-half-of-wisconsin-residents-want-legal-cannabis-poll/ Fri, 04 Mar 2022 22:27:28 +0000 https://remedii.net/more-than-half-of-wisconsin-residents-want-legal-cannabis-poll/ March 4, 2022 Support for cannabis legalization in Badger State is growing, according to the Marquette University Law School poll released this week. The poll found that 61% of those polled favored legalization, with 31% opposed to ending the state ban. The survey found majority support among Republicans, with 51%, as well as independents (60%) […]]]>

March 4, 2022

Support for cannabis legalization in Badger State is growing, according to the Marquette University Law School poll released this week. The poll found that 61% of those polled favored legalization, with 31% opposed to ending the state ban. The survey found majority support among Republicans, with 51%, as well as independents (60%) and Democrats (75%).

Support among the three groups has increased “by 20 points or more” in the past decade since the poll began asking Wisconsin voters the question, said Charles Franklin, director of the Wisconsin Law School poll. Marquette University. The latest poll “is the first time we’ve seen a Republican majority in favor of this poll,” he said at a Milwaukee Press Club event on Thursday.

In October 2013, 50% of all voters and 53% of Democrats in the survey supported legalization. Meanwhile, 51% of Republican respondents favored keeping cannabis illegal in this survey; which fell to 42% in the February 2022 poll. Among independents, support for legalized cannabis rose from 49% in 2013 and peaked at 68% in 2019 before declining to the current 60%.

Franklin said support increases even more when questions are framed to focus on legalizing medical cannabis, support increases even more. Also, phrasing the question differently, such as asking if cannabis should be regulated like alcohol, does not seem to affect Wisconsin residents’ responses.

Despite majority support, the movement to legalize cannabis within the legislature is non-existent. Republican lawmakers in Wisconsin have rejected attempts to legalize the recreational use of cannabis. Some officials, however, have introduced bills either to legalize forms of medical cannabis or to lower existing penalties for possession. Some pro-reform activists have chosen to organize for local sanctions to be reduced or abolished, rather than expending energy at the state level. The most recent bill discussed in the Legislature regarding cannabis was to increase penalties for possession of cannabis extracts made from butane.


Get morning headlines delivered to your inbox. Subscribe.


The Wisconsin Examiner, a nonpartisan, nonprofit news site, provides a fresh perspective on state politics and politics through investigative reporting and daily coverage dedicated to the public interest. The Examiner is part of States Newsroom, a national 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization supported by grants and a coalition of donors and readers.

]]>
City of Ridgeland withdraws from medical marijuana https://remedii.net/city-of-ridgeland-withdraws-from-medical-marijuana/ Wed, 02 Mar 2022 04:24:02 +0000 https://remedii.net/city-of-ridgeland-withdraws-from-medical-marijuana/ RIDGELAND, Miss. (WJTV) – Under state law, a city can deny the processing, sale, cultivation and/or distribution of medical marijuana and marijuana products in a city under the Cannabis Act. Mississippi Medical. Ridgeland is one of the first cities to make this decision. According to Ward 6 Alderman Wesley Hamlin, people living in Ridgeland can […]]]>

RIDGELAND, Miss. (WJTV) – Under state law, a city can deny the processing, sale, cultivation and/or distribution of medical marijuana and marijuana products in a city under the Cannabis Act. Mississippi Medical.

Ridgeland is one of the first cities to make this decision. According to Ward 6 Alderman Wesley Hamlin, people living in Ridgeland can still get the medications they need as long as they have proof from their doctor. However, the ruling will prevent storefronts and transactions within the city limits.

Under the Mississippi Medical Cannabis Act, a city can choose to re-register at any time.

The alderman of Ridgeland said the move is the best for the town at this time.

“One of the main reasons was that it was new and we didn’t really know its functionality, how it works, etc. In my opinion, the withdrawal just gives us the opportunity to look from afar in the other cities that do not don’t withdraw and see how it works and see the business structure of it all so for me it just gives us an opportunity to step back and watch and see how it works the good, the bad, the ugly, pros, cons.

Alderman Wesley Hamlin said his constituents support the decision to temporarily withdraw from the medical cannabis business in Ridgeland.

Ridgeland residents have the ability to file a referendum to overturn the decision, but the alderman says he doesn’t see that happening at this time.

]]>
Are mainstream wellness consumers ready for cannabinoids? With the right delivery format, they could be. https://remedii.net/are-mainstream-wellness-consumers-ready-for-cannabinoids-with-the-right-delivery-format-they-could-be/ Tue, 01 Mar 2022 13:41:42 +0000 https://remedii.net/are-mainstream-wellness-consumers-ready-for-cannabinoids-with-the-right-delivery-format-they-could-be/ At last count, there were over 2,000 CBD brands on the market, ranging from your garden variety (and sometimes questionable quality) “gas station” products available almost anywhere to high cost “premium” products. sold in boutiques and specialties. websites. Additionally, new regulated markets for adult-use cannabis continue to come online in the United States, and sales […]]]>

At last count, there were over 2,000 CBD brands on the market, ranging from your garden variety (and sometimes questionable quality) “gas station” products available almost anywhere to high cost “premium” products. sold in boutiques and specialties. websites. Additionally, new regulated markets for adult-use cannabis continue to come online in the United States, and sales of cannabis products continue to rack up record numbers state after state.

There is no doubt that cannabidiol (CBD), tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), terpenes, and a host of other cannabinoids are being embraced by consumers across the country, from those who use cannabis strictly as medicine to recreational consumers pursuing wellness goals like relaxation and anxiety. relief. Always on the lookout for the next big thing, wellness consumers have always been early adopters of new ingredients once they become available. This seems to be the case with cannabinoids as new consumers flock to CBD and become more interested in other cannabinoids.

However, the lack of knowledge of certain delivery methods as well as the desire to avoid products requiring inhalation keep some consumers away from well-being. When CBD hit stores and the first regulated cannabis markets were created, the first users were medical patients seeking an alternative to ineffective or risky treatments, and lifelong cannabis enthusiasts. There was limited appeal to the mainstream wellness consumer, and there was often little information about cannabis efficacy to be found for those intrigued.

The importance of becoming familiar with a product cannot be overstated, according to Bridget Williams, MD, an Ohio physician with a medical cannabis license. “For a patient to take treatment seriously, they need to feel comfortable and credible about how it is administered. I think even the gummy form factor can be a challenge for some people. They find it difficult to consider it a “medicine”. For many consumers, what they really need is something like any other treatment they might find in their medicine cabinet.

Today, an explosion of new cannabinoid products is reaching the public and encouraging long-time resisters to consider cannabis more. Over the past 12 months, manufacturers have been racing to incorporate “minor cannabinoids” into new products. These are compounds found to a lesser degree than CBD or THC in hemp and marijuana plants that have demonstrated positive effects but are generally not psychoactive. Examples include cannabinol (CBN), which is often used as a sleep aid, and tetrahydrocannabivarin (THCV), which many consider to be an effective appetite suppressant.

Often what makes these new products appealing to mainstream consumers is that they don’t look like “cannabis” products. They don’t need to be smoked or vaporized or inhaled, and they’re not oils that need to be placed under the tongue or mixed into a drink. Most popular is the “gummy” form factor that consumers have long known, but many still typically associate with candy.

“Consumers who use products for specific wellness purposes expect those products to ‘look and act the way they should,’ says Andrew Wolf, CEO of hemp CPG company AllyMack. “They want a form factor that they are comfortable using and familiar to them, and they want it as an integral part of their daily health regime.These consumers are looking for traditional formats like mints, chewable tablets and capsules.

They also want precise dosing and consistent results, which have often been elusive for cannabinoids. As a growing number of wellness product manufacturers attempt to incorporate CBD and other cannabinoids into their products, their efforts have been thwarted by the very nature of the ingredients. When cannabinoids and terpenes are extracted from the hemp or marijuana plant, the result is an oil in the same way that fragrances and cooking oils are extracted from organic materials. Unfortunately, oil-based cannabinoids do not work well with many nutraceutical ingredients. It can be extremely difficult to balance the ratios between different ingredients, which ultimately leads to inconsistent products.

Today, the race is on to develop consistent and versatile ingredients that can be used in a variety of products, providing broad consumer appeal. Technology and innovation are beginning to break down the barrier of oil-based cannabinoid ingredients through the development of fully miscible pharmaceutical grade cannabinoid ingredients. This breakthrough promises to open up wellness products to a whole new class of ingredients just as cannabinoids become popular with consumers. Additionally, the growing acceptance of cannabinoids is accelerating research efforts to confirm and expand existing knowledge about these compounds.

When wellness consumers recognize that they can experience the benefits of cannabinoids and terpenes without inhaling or ingesting nasty candies or oils, the floodgates will open for new product innovations. Propelled by this growing consumer interest, an era of consistent and reliable integration of cannabinoids into mainstream nutraceutical and pharmaceutical ingredients may soon materialize.

Derek Odette is CEO of the Tennessee-based company Volunteer Botanicalsdeveloper of precise cannabinoid formulations that provide manufacturers with consistent and versatile hemp-based ingredients for use in a wide variety of products meeting the specific demands of product creators inside and outside of the hemp industry .

]]>
No new pot dispensaries in Spearfish yet | Local News https://remedii.net/no-new-pot-dispensaries-in-spearfish-yet-local-news/ Sat, 26 Feb 2022 13:00:00 +0000 https://remedii.net/no-new-pot-dispensaries-in-spearfish-yet-local-news/ SPEARFISH — After considering a second application from a business seeking to open a second dispensary in Spearfish, City Council decided not to change Ordinance 1364, which states that only one cannabis dispensary may be permitted within the boundaries from the city. “By only allowing one you are creating a monopoly and that cannabis store […]]]>

SPEARFISH — After considering a second application from a business seeking to open a second dispensary in Spearfish, City Council decided not to change Ordinance 1364, which states that only one cannabis dispensary may be permitted within the boundaries from the city.

“By only allowing one you are creating a monopoly and that cannabis store in your town, with no competition, could drive up the cost for your residents, or worse cause them to leave town for their prescriptions and encourage a black market that is currently in existence,” urged James Gwynn, of From the Hills LLC, a rival Sturgis-registered dispensary business, as he addressed the board at its Dec. 20 meeting.

Earlier in December, Spearfish Town Council drew names to select the one and only cannabis dispensary license that would be awarded. The name that was drawn was “Déjà VU SD LLC”. registered with Spearfish’s Char Gamble.

Gwynn urged council to consider not only Spearfish’s permanent population, but also the influx of visitors and students, who would pass through and also need to fill prescriptions.

“Spearfish (is) the largest town (in the northern hills) with a 70 mile radius for its retail,” he said.

Although currently no applications have been forwarded to the city’s finance office for other cannabis establishments, Gwynn also pointed to the city’s ordinance, which authorizes two cultivation, manufacturing and testing facilities. in the city.

“The product made from these facilities would be far more than a store could sell. It should be sold in other cities and that would benefit retail sales outside of Spearfish,” he predicted.

The board thanked Gwynn for her input, but could not make a decision on the comments made during the public comment portion of a board meeting.

Gwynn was back on January 18 to again urge the council to reconsider the dispensary’s sole limitation.

At Tuesday’s council meeting, Mayor Dana Boke addressed the council, asking for its opinion on the matter, but said she preferred the city to continue on its current path for the time being.

“My opinion is that we’re still working on the medical marijuana side, and we can see what the timeline and the rules are for recreation, and I think I’m comfortable with where we are,” said Boke.

Senate Bill 3 would authorize the recreational use of marijuana and is currently in the process of being passed by the state legislature after being passed by the Senate on Wednesday. Councilman Scott Hourigan asked how this bill would affect ordinances on medical cannabis establishments in the city if it passes the House and eventually becomes law.

Spearfish City attorney Ashley McDonald said all establishments in the process of being licensed probably won’t have to start from scratch if recreational marijuana becomes legal, but new regulations and standards should be met by these establishments.

“I anticipate there would be different regulations for recreational marijuana than medical marijuana, so they probably couldn’t just get in there,” McDonald replied.

Ultimately, the board agreed that only a cannabis dispensary would be enough for Spearfish at this time, but noted that they would keep an eye on the market as marijuana becomes a growing industry in South Dakota. .

“I would say stay the course we planned and we can always adjust in the future if we need to,” adviser Dan Hodgs said.

To read all of today’s stories, click here or call 642-2761 to subscribe to our e-edition or home delivery.

]]>
After legalization, the cannabis industry loses its luster https://remedii.net/after-legalization-the-cannabis-industry-loses-its-luster/ Sat, 26 Feb 2022 00:00:25 +0000 https://remedii.net/after-legalization-the-cannabis-industry-loses-its-luster/ Nevada County cannabis legalization advocate Wade Laughter stands on his nearly two-acre property off Idaho Maryland Road in rural Grass Valley. His property is too small for a cannabis farm, according to regulations set by the county. The post-legalization reality for Nevada County cannabis growers is not what Laughter fought for.Elias Funez/efunez@theunion.com The legalization of […]]]>

Nevada County cannabis legalization advocate Wade Laughter stands on his nearly two-acre property off Idaho Maryland Road in rural Grass Valley. His property is too small for a cannabis farm, according to regulations set by the county. The post-legalization reality for Nevada County cannabis growers is not what Laughter fought for.
Elias Funez/efunez@theunion.com

The legalization of pot has changed the Californian landscape, literally and figuratively.

The profit margin between growing cannabis and the licensing process has narrowed markedly since Proposition 64 was passed in 2016, according to long-term legalization advocates in Nevada County.

Diana Gamzon, executive director of the Nevada County Cannabis Alliance, estimated the total cost of permits for a farm she worked with last year at $50,000.



Wade Laughter, a longtime medical cannabis advocate, said that for some, the price to pay to become legal after all farm infrastructure is up to code could approach $250,000.

“Everything must be permitted,” Laughter said. “All buildings – the greenhouse must have a permit, the road must have a permit – everything must comply with fire safety standards.”



Laughter, who grows CBD-dominant strains, said his advocacy was never rooted in profit, but the falling cost of flowers combined with bureaucratic hurdles to “go legit” aren’t viable for the average farmer. .

“There are all these requirements that have nothing to do with a garden,” Laughter said. “A cannabis farm is a commercial enterprise, like a gas station or a Walmart.”

Laughter said it’s been frustrating to see the industry become hostile to small entrepreneurs because of the altruistic intent that fuels his own calling – connecting those in need to plant medicine.

“All of my work was donation-based,” Laughter said of his time connecting patients with peripheral neuropathy and varying degrees of autism to cannabis through the Caladrius Network. “Most of the cannabis grown on my farm has been made into tinctures, edibles or suppositories and given away for free. It seems unfair to me to put a price tag on most people determined enough to find me and ask for my help. The medical system had already taken their money.

A greenhouse and outdoor agricultural area were deemed unsuitable for growing cannabis on Wade Laughter’s property due to the narrow size of the property, among other reasons.
Elias Funez/efunez@theunion.com

Laughter has already taken his advocacy to Sacramento, speaking in particular with and on behalf of Forrest Hurd who said locally grown CBD eased the symptoms of his son’s incurable epilepsy, caused by Lennox-Gestault Syndrome.

“There are a whole range of conditions that cannabis seems to help,” Laughter said. “I say it like that because I don’t like to state things, but I have, over the years, seen dramatic improvements when we find the chemistry that works for someone’s individual needs.”

Even with the high cost of legalization, Laughter said that as an advocate for the plant‘s medicinal benefits — especially to the terminally ill — he would apply for a permit if the physical parameters of his farm did not immediately disqualify his property.

Laughter said he consulted with lawyers to maintain his legal status amid rapidly changing legislation — enactment and enforcement — between 2016 and 2018, while cultivating and distributing strains of CBD for free.

Even after three of Nevada County’s five current supervisors — Heidi Hall, Ed Scofield and Sue Hoeck — visited Laughter’s property off Idaho-Maryland Road, the attorney’s property was automatically disqualified from a cannabis business license because the land falls within Zoning Res-Ag.

“It’s not because (the industry) is dangerous or filled with criminal activity,” Laughter said. “That’s because some neighborhoods with the Res Ag zoning have been strongly opposed. Politics is a matter of finding compromises.

Laughter’s property is also not large enough to qualify for cash cropping, he said, so even if Laughter lived elsewhere on such a narrow plot – “my property doesn’t quite measure 200 feet wide” – it does not meet the 2 acre minimum.

CHANGING INDUSTRY

According to Nevada County Chief Financial Officer Martin Polt, the county spent “a lot of money” over three to five years to advance licensed cultivation efforts in Nevada County.

Polt said the county has invested “significant dollars” to develop the licensing program, including staff dedicated to planning and building aspects of the legalization process, as well as cannabis compliance units.

Polt said he couldn’t determine the total amount invested in developing the program, citing complexities between overlapping and separate responsibilities for cannabis code enforcement and the county’s planning department.

Beyond that, Polt said, Grass Valley and Nevada City are responsible for cultivation and distribution permits and procedures in their respective municipalities.

“Nevada City uses our planning and services department, but they reimburse us,” Polt said. “The infrastructure is somewhat different for each of the jurisdictions.”

Polt said the county provides some infrastructural support, but each jurisdiction must develop its own regulations and ordinances.

Barry Anderson, a management analyst with the Nevada County Executive Office, said $1.9 million is the cost to the county so far for legal operations.

“The County General Fund has invested $1.9 million, beginning in fiscal year 2018/19 through the current fiscal year, to set up the Cannabis Compliance Division,” Anderson said. “This does not include the costs associated with measuring tax revenue.”

“I’m not saying we’re going to recoup the costs,” Polt said. “We haven’t caught up by any means…. It’s more than a drop in a bucket.“

Polt said it’s difficult to identify concrete costs to public agencies engaged in local legalization because the cannabis industry engages different county resource areas that provide support and monitor the industry.

Wade Laughter’s four-acre property is too small to grow cannabis, according to rules set by Nevada county officials.
Elias Funez/efunez@theunion.com

Josh Merriman of County Cannabis Compliance said the county began issuing permits and collecting fees in 2019 when the program began.

Merriman said the fees attached to permits exclusively pay for staff time.

“There are no official fees outside of time,” Merriman said. “Staff time is billed by the hour.”

Nevada County has one of the lowest — if not the lowest — fees for obtaining an administrative development permit for up to 10,000 square feet of cannabis, Merriman said. Smaller sites applying for commercial cannabis licenses have a “faster turnaround time.”

After investigating similar processes in Yolo County, Merriman said he discovered the agency was charging $40,000 for the permit with an annual fee of $9,000.

“Our annual dues are $900,” Merriman said.

Laughter said a Nevada County farmer seeking legitimacy would pay less than growers in other counties because the latter must pay for the county permit and the state license separately.

“Once you get a permit, you have to get a license from the state,” Laughter said. “It’s a whole different level of difficulty.”

Nevada County supervisors conducted a countywide environmental impact report in 2018, Merriman said, which gave way to an order offering umbrella state license eligibility for permit recipients. .

“Other jurisdictions require a conditional use permit,” Merriman said, adding that site-specific analysis required with the permit application is typically time-consuming and expensive. “We did a county-wide EIR, so we have a streamlined cookie-cutter order.”

Laughter noted that a farmer in Mendocino trying to legalize his business would pay thousands of dollars more than a grower in Santa Barbara, one of the few other counties with a similar inclusive ordinance.

“Look with the Idaho-Maryland mine,” Laughter said, referring to the lengthy process it took for Rise Grass Valley to reopen gold mining operations on two properties zoned for light industry. “Imagine if every farm had to do this.”

A Nevada County grand jury report released in May 2021 estimated that there were between 3,500 and 4,000 “illegal crops” in operation.

According to Merriman, administrators have received 239 license applications to date. One hundred and fifty-five have been approved so far, Merriman said, and the rest remain in various stages of review.

“If you don’t have a permit and license, you can’t operate,” Laughter said. “That’s why Nevada County is seeing an explosion here – you can legally operate in the cannabis market.”

Rebecca O’Neil is a staff writer for The Union. She can be reached at roneil@theunion.com

]]>