State charges two attorneys in medical marijuana ghost owner case

Two Oklahoma attorneys have been charged after they allegedly helped set up hundreds of “ghost owners” of medical marijuana operations. shop in the state to export pot grown in Oklahoma. |SEE ALSO| Oklahoma lawyers accused of facilitating illegal medical marijuana operations And, the AG said, the two lawyers were helping to make it easy to do. “These charges filed today should send a loud and clear message to anyone involved in a criminal operation in Oklahoma that we will find you and prosecute you,” O’Connor said. Attorneys Logan Jones and Eric Brown of the Jones Brown Law Firm have been charged with facilitating more than 400 illegal marijuana operations in Garvin County. Investigators say the lawyers provided false information to the Oklahoma Medical Marijuana Authority and the Oklahoma Bureau of Narcotics, paving the way for illegal crops. | MORE | The medical marijuana industry has a huge impact on rural Oklahoma and Brown Jones reportedly provided company employees as ‘ghost owners’ in exchange for operators signing an agreement $3,000 consulting fee. “First of all, understand, people are getting these licenses — on the face of it, they look legit,” OBN director Donnie Anderson said. The two lawyers face charges of conspiracy to cultivate a controlled and dangerous substance; supply of false or falsified instruments. ruments for registration; culture of a controlled and dangerous substance; and a model criminal offence. Anderson said the case is one of hundreds the agency is investigating. “People are getting a license fraudulently because they are claiming someone owns 75%, which is not the case. They are paying individuals to get a license in their name, so that’s the first part of fraud, it used to be called shadow structuring, so that’s one of the early parts, but if you get into one of them grows on face value and the OMA got criticism at On this subject, it’s not the OMA’s fault because when you go in and inspect these things, everything is in order, it looks legit,” Anderson said. | WATCH | Tornado hits marijuana farm near MaudThe Oklahoma Cannabis Industry Association said compliance is hard to maintain because it changes frequently, but that’s no reason for bad actors to take advantage. must be restricted from operating in our industry,” the association’s Blake Cantrell said. The law firm Jones Brown chose not to comment on this story.

Two Oklahoma lawyers have been charged after allegedly helping set up hundreds of “ghost owners” of medical marijuana operations.

Oklahoma Attorney General John O’Connor said his office and the Oklahoma Bureau of Narcotics crack down on out-of-state growers who move into the state to export pot grown in Oklahoma.

|SEE ALSO| Oklahoma lawyers charged with facilitating illegal medical marijuana operations

And, the AG said, the two lawyers were helping to make it easy to do.

“These charges filed today should send a loud and clear message to anyone involved in a criminal operation in Oklahoma that we will find you and prosecute you,” O’Connor said.

Attorneys Logan Jones and Eric Brown of the Jones Brown Law Firm have been charged with facilitating more than 400 illegal marijuana operations in Garvin County.

Investigators say the lawyers provided false information to the Oklahoma Medical Marijuana Authority and the Oklahoma Bureau of Narcotics, paving the way for illegal crops.

|AFTER| Medical Marijuana Industry Creates Booming Impact on Rural Oklahoma

Jones and Brown allegedly provided employees of their company as “ghost owners” in exchange for operators aggregating to sign a $3,000 consulting agreement.

“First of all, understand, people get these licenses — on the face of it, they look legit,” OBN director Donnie Anderson said.

The two lawyers face charges of conspiracy to cultivate a controlled and dangerous substance; offer false or falsified instruments for recording; culture of a controlled and dangerous substance; and a model criminal offence.

Anderson said the case is one of hundreds the agency is investigating.

“People are getting a license fraudulently because they are claiming someone owns 75%, which is not the case. They are paying individuals to get a license in their name, so that’s the first part of fraud, it used to be called shadow structuring, so that’s one of the early parts, but if you get into one of them grows on face value and the OMA got criticism at On this subject, it’s not the OMA’s fault because when you go in and inspect these things, everything is in order, it seems legit,” says Anderson.

|LOOK| Tornado hits marijuana farm near Maud

The Oklahoma Cannabis Industry Association said compliance is difficult to maintain because it changes frequently, but that doesn’t justify bad actors taking advantage of it.

“Our position on anyone knowingly violating any laws or regulations in our industry must be prevented from operating in our industry,” said the association’s Blake Cantrell.

Jones Brown Law has chosen not to comment on this story.

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