Cannabis Plant – Remedii http://remedii.net/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 13:39:49 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://remedii.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2-150x150.png Cannabis Plant – Remedii http://remedii.net/ 32 32 A Lakeview and Lincoln Park Gift Guide https://remedii.net/a-lakeview-and-lincoln-park-gift-guide/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 13:39:49 +0000 https://remedii.net/a-lakeview-and-lincoln-park-gift-guide/ Credit: Danielle Deschaine Want to support Block Club gift guides and our other local newspapers? Subscribe here Where Click here offer a subscription. If you do today, you’ll get a free 16×20 inch Chicago neighborhood print of your choice! LAKEVIEW – Neighbors can find the perfect holiday gift while giving small businesses much-needed support by […]]]>
Credit: Danielle Deschaine

Want to support Block Club gift guides and our other local newspapers? Subscribe here Where Click here offer a subscription. If you do today, you’ll get a free 16×20 inch Chicago neighborhood print of your choice!

LAKEVIEW – Neighbors can find the perfect holiday gift while giving small businesses much-needed support by buying local this season.

Business owners in Lakeview and Lincoln Park are looking forward to the holidays and are ready to help any shopper find the perfect gifts for their loved ones.

To make holiday shopping easier, Block Club has rounded up some of Lakeview and Lincoln Park’s gift options.

Here’s what you can buy:

Lake view

Credit: Barks N’ Rec
Barks N’ rec pet store has dog parkas ($49.99-$72.99) and beer bottle-inspired stuffed animals ($13.99).

Barks N’ Rec, 3030 N. Lincoln Ave. Website.

This local pet shop has tons of possible gifts for pet owners and their dogs.

This store is focused on pet education, healthy food options, treats and toys.

Potential gifts include a dog parka made from recycled materials ($49.99 – $72.99) and various toys, including a plush otter ($21.99) and plush beer bottle ($13.99).

Barks N’ Rec is open 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday. 773-698-6595.

Credit: Facebook/BottlesUp
BottlesUp has a membership club for $30/month where members receive two bottles of wine per month, in-store discounts, and invitations to classes and special events.

BottlesUp, 3164 N. Broadway. Website.

BotttlesUp fulfills owner Melissa Zeman’s ten-year dream of opening her own wine boutique.

Visitors will find a variety of wines, beers, spirits, sake, hard cider, kombucha and seltzers.

Another gift idea is a BottlesUp Club membership, which starts at $30 per month and includes two bottles of wine each month, informative articles and recipes for each bottle, in-store discounts, and invites to classes and events. specials.

BottlesUp is open from 12 p.m. to 8 p.m. Monday to Thursday, from 12 p.m. to 9 p.m. from Friday to Saturday and from 12 p.m. to 7 p.m. on Sunday. 773-362-4999.

Credit: Jake Wittich/Block Club Chicago
Vanessa Rodriguez, owner of Baby Doll Boutiques and author of “Chicago Loves Me.”

BabyDolls Boutique, 3727 N. Southport Ave. Website.

Vanessa Rodriguez opened BabyDolls Boutique in 2007 when she began designing her own line of children’s clothing.

Since then, Rodriguez has written her first children’s book, “Chicago Loves Me,” which would make the perfect gift for any little kid. The book, which Rodriguez hopes will be the first in a series, can be purchased as a log ($11.99) or a regular, hardcover ($16.99).

Rodriguez also posted a line of Chicago-themed flags teething toys for baby ($14.99), onesies ($28.50) and knit hats ($39) for any “Chicago Loves Me” reader.

BabyDolls Boutique is open from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday to Friday, from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday and from 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. on Sunday. 773-525-2229.

Credit: Jake Wittich/Block Club Chicago
Peter Moon and Helen Kim, co-owners of Coffee Lab and Roasters, 2823 N. Lincoln Ave.

Coffee Lab and Roasters, 2823 N. Lincoln Ave. Website.

Any coffee lover would appreciate a bag of beans from Lakeview’s Coffee Lab & Roaster.

Helen Kim, who was the general manager in which she bought the shop until May 2019, owns the cafe with her husband, Peter Moon. Their mission is to provide a specialty coffee experience in an accessible and unpretentious environment.

coffee sells bean bags from countries around the world, including Ethiopia, Colombia and Brazil. The bags are 12 ounces and cost between $20 and $22.

The cafe is open from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. daily. 773-799-8361.

Credit: Jake Wittich/Block Club Chicago
Men’s Hall, 3343 N. Halsted St.

Men’s Room Chicago, 3343 N. Halsted St. Website.

In the heart of Northalsted, Men’s Room offers fetish gear, leather harnesses, handcuffs, underwear and sex toys.

Originally opened in 2016, Men’s Room recently moved to its current storefront next to Sidetrack. It’s the perfect place to stock up on necessities for anyone who loves events like International Mr. Leather, Chicago Pride, Market Days and more.

In store, shoppers will find a mix of shirts, shorts and other apparel along with its other items. Gifts available online include a leather armband ($29.95) and the leather harness ($149.95).

Men’s Room Chicago is open from noon to 8 p.m. Monday, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesday through Friday, and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday through Sunday. 773-857-0907.

Credit: Camryn Cutinello/Block Club Chicago
Guasso renovated the storefront to include a back room in the main floor plan.

Plant Stand Collective, 3247 N. Broadway. Website.

Plant Stand Collective got its start when owner Maria Guasso was laid off during the pandemic and launched a series of pop-ups to sell her pieces and the work of other artists.

The company has found a permanent home in Lakeview, where it sells painted pots, plants and more for every home gardener.

Plant Stand Collective also offers a variety of services, including consultations, repotting and plant sitting.

The company doesn’t have an online store, so shoppers will have to go through its physical location to find the perfect gift.

Plant Stand Collective is open Tuesday through Thursday from 12 p.m. to 6 p.m., Friday from 12 p.m. to 6 p.m., Saturday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. 773-319-7673.

Lincoln Park

Credit: Jake Wittich/Block Club Chicago
Chicago Cannabis Company offers everything from cannabinoid-infused tinctures to treats like gummies.

Chicago Cannabis Company, 2501 N. Halsted St. Website.

Chicago Cannabis Company is a cooperative CBD store specializing in CBD extracts and other cannabinoid-infused products, ranging from gummies to seltzers and other beverages.

The store, which opened in May, has a wide variety of possible gifts for any CBD lover. Buyers can purchase standard items, including vape cartridges ($45) and gummies ($25), or indulge in the company’s CBD-infused seltzers ($5/box).

Chicago Cannabis Company is open from noon to 8 p.m. Monday through Friday and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday through Sunday. 773-698-6193.

Credit: Colin Boyle/Block Club Chicago
Josh Moulton poses with a painting he made of Manny’s Deli at his art gallery, 2218 N. Clark St., in Lincoln Park on October 13, 2022.

Josh Moulton Fine Art Gallery, 2218 N. Clark St. Website.

Artist Josh Moulton offers a variety of original paintings and prints that would make the perfect gift for any art lover.

The gallery, which celebrated its 11th anniversary this year, sells Moulton’s art in large format prints, paintings, postcards and small prints.

Consider gifting someone a Moulton large format prints recognizable Chicago landscapes, including the Chicago skyline seen from the old town ($200). Moulton’s work is also available in regular size prints ($50 to $100) and small prints ($20-$50).

The shop is open by appointment. 773-592-3434.

Credit: Offsite
Off Premise offers a classic gift box with moonshine, pure bourbon and chocolate whiskey ($80) and a Chicago gift basket with Malort and the ingredients to make a Chicago-style hot dog ($95).

Offsite, 1128 W. Armitage Ave. Website.

Off Premise on Armitage Avenue is the perfect one stop shop for all the booze lovers in your life.

The store offers matching gift baskets that make holiday shopping easy. The Kings County Classic Gift Set ($80) contains a bottle of moonshine, neat bourbon, and chocolate whiskey, while the Welcome to Chicago, Pal Gift Basket ($95) contains a bottle of Malort and all the ingredients to make a Chicago-style hot dog.

Off Premise is open from noon to 9 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday and noon to 7 p.m. on Sunday. 773-770-3540.

Credit: To play
Play sells various gift sets ranging from $35 to $150.

Play at Lincoln Park, 2462 N. Lincoln Ave. Website.

Anyone shopping for kids will likely find what they need at Play in Lincoln Park.

Play offers on-call gift wrapping, ordering and delivery services. The store also offers gift boxes ($35 to $150) to make shopping easier.

The Thinking of you…gift box comes with a variety of Chicago-themed books and toys, and the Gourmet box comes with food-related books and toys.

Play Lincoln Park is open 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday. 773-799-8038.

Credit: Pyar&Co.
Possible gifts from Pyar&Co. include a patterned pillow ($105) or fanny pack ($38).

Pyar&Co., 2132 N. Halsted St. Website.

Pyar&Co. offers luxury clothing and home accessories made from the most luxurious fabrics found in India.

Possible gifts include a pattern lumbar pillow ($105) and banana bag ($38). But shoppers are encouraged to visit in person to take in the beauty of the store.

Founder Paula Queen was inspired to open the store after traveling to India with her Indian-born husband, Sumit.

Pyar&Co. is open Tuesday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Wednesday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Thursday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Friday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Saturday from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. and sometimes on Sunday. 312-451-5073.

Credit: Third rib stitches
Third Coast Stitches sells needlepoint kits to make the Chicago flag ($46.67) and beanbag ($68.18).

Third Coast Stitches, 707 W. Armitage Ave. Website.

This women-owned tapestry shop offers a wide variety of yarns, tapestry kits, and other holiday gifts.

For beginners, you can enter the kit for people to make a needlepoint goldendoodle ($63). People more advanced with embroidery might appreciate the Chicago Flag Keychain Kit ($46.67) or the Chicago bean set ($68.18).

Third Coast Stitches is open 12 p.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesday, 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday through Friday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, and 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday. 312-285-2221.

Listen to “It’s Alright: A Block Club Chicago Podcast”:

]]>
OAP (73) arrested for growing 40 cannabis plants at home says he won’t quit smoking weed https://remedii.net/oap-73-arrested-for-growing-40-cannabis-plants-at-home-says-he-wont-quit-smoking-weed/ Sat, 19 Nov 2022 12:57:52 +0000 https://remedii.net/oap-73-arrested-for-growing-40-cannabis-plants-at-home-says-he-wont-quit-smoking-weed/ “It’s a ridiculous waste of state money and for what? It won’t stop me from smoking. Former jazz drummer and fish industry worker Richard Goldfrap, whom Gardai describes as a “nice man”, was arrested with 40 cannabis plants he was growing for his personal use at his home in the remote area of Kilcoe near […]]]>

“It’s a ridiculous waste of state money and for what? It won’t stop me from smoking.

Former jazz drummer and fish industry worker Richard Goldfrap, whom Gardai describes as a “nice man”, was arrested with 40 cannabis plants he was growing for his personal use at his home in the remote area of Kilcoe near Roaringwater Bay near Skibbereen in West Cork on June 11 last year.

Judge Helen Boyle this week handed him a three-year suspended sentence at Cork Circuit Court, but warned him he could face a custodial sentence if arrested again because he was of his second conviction for such an offence.

Mr Goldfrap told The Sunday World this week that criminalizing cannabis users is a complete waste of state resources.

“It’s a ridiculous waste of state money and for what? It won’t stop me from smoking.

“My lawyer sent me a letter saying please don’t start growing it again because you could be in big trouble, even though I have big health issues and am 73.”

He said that although he had smoked weed most of his life in recent years, he used it for pain relief.

“I took it mainly for the pain. I have a lot of health issues and a lot of pharmaceutical drugs don’t handle them very well and there are a lot of side effects, but with marijuana the side effect is you get a good high.

“There’s no difference between a guy having a few pints of Guinness after work. It’s a crazy law.

A growing number of countries around the world have legalized or decriminalized cannabis for personal use, and German lawmakers recently unveiled plans to decriminalize possession of up to 30 grams of cannabis and allow the substance to be sold to adults for medical purposes. recreational activities in a controlled market.

“I think Ireland should catch up,” Mr Goldfrap said.

“For me the heart of it all is that they are criminalizing young people and they are being forced into the hands of the dealers because it’s illegal then they go to the black market and if the dealer doesn’t have that they want, they go away.” them something else.

“If they legalize it, they can do what they do in America, which is tax it. They can use that tax to build hospitals, roads, infrastructure, and they can monitor its purity. .

He said he doesn’t approve of high-strength marijuana which is specifically bred to have high levels of THC, but sees nothing wrong with low-strength strains.

If he wants to smoke cannabis now, he will have to buy it rather than grow his own.

“I’m just going to mark it on the black market. I know people who grow it and they don’t genetically modify it and make a naturally growing plant and it’s a very good success to put it into common parlance. Skunk is a horrible thing. Even people of my generation say to stay away.

When he appeared in court this week, Garda Detective Andrew Manning described Mr Goldfrap as a ‘pleasant man to deal with’ who co-operated fully with the investigation.

The feeling was mutual.

“The guard who stopped me, Andrew, was very nice. He said I didn’t bother him at all.

“Funny enough, people of my generation who smoke are nice people. We don’t bother people; we don’t get angry and start fighting people.

“I have no animosity towards the gardai. They are employed to do a job that they do and they have to pay their mortgage and raise their children like everyone else.

Originally from the UK, Mr Goldfrap, who had ancestors from Carlow, came to Ireland in 1997 after being made redundant from a job in the fishing industry in Cornwall.

“I came in an RV and drove around and ended up here [in west Cork]. I thought the river was beautiful and it is close to the sea. I came from Cornwall and I like to be close to the sea.”

He bought land in Kilcoe in 1999 and has lived there ever since.

He said that aside from his cannabis plants, the only other time he got in trouble with the law was when he was arrested protesting the Vietnam War in the early 1970s.

“It was the only time I was put against the wall,” he said, adding that he hadn’t even been sentenced for it.

“I’m just a normal person.”

“Actually, I have an art degree, but I make a living out of it. [is hard].

“I think there’s a lot of rebels in us art students.”

He said he used to play drums in a band when he was younger.

“I was more into jazz than rock and roll. I can’t read music, so I didn’t get very far, but it was fantastic. I used to have regular concerts on Friday night, Saturday night and Sunday afternoon as a trio.

Her sister Alison has had more success in the music industry and is the lead singer of multi-platinum band Goldfrapp – adding ap to the end of their name for effect.

Mr Goldfrap said he was unsure how he came across Gardai’s radar. He didn’t sell cannabis and grew it naturally rather than using special lighting, tents, or hydroponics that might attract attention.

He had suspicions about two people who once wandered onto his land saying they had gotten lost while he was repotting his cannabis plants.

“Something about them didn’t ring true. One of them was a lady who kept her head down all the time. I was actually potting them up on an open table when they came to my yard saying they were lost. I said “Well, you can walk by my house and walk out that way”, which they did, but I think they shouted or whatever.

He also said it could have been someone else. “It could have been, but you just don’t know.”

He said he had no idea what the plants were worth

“It was ridiculous. I don’t know [how much it was worth] I had 40 very young plants and they seemed to value their value a lot. Apparently, an adult plant is worth so much money. it’s crazy.”

He said cannabis grown using specialized equipment can be lucrative.

“They can charge a lot of money and make a fortune. They can grow a crop that ripens after three months. It has been tweaked and tweaked to have as much THC as possible, which is driving people crazy.

“That’s why they care a lot about what it’s worth if you sell it. Said I don’t know what it’s worth, I don’t sell this fucking stuff. Why would I grow it for myself and sell it, because then I would have to restock it on the black market. »

He said legalization would lead to better controls around drugs.

“If they legalize it, they can control the quality and the strength.”

“The money it costs the police could be used for much more useful purposes.”

Possession of cannabis is currently illegal in Ireland, except for those with a Minister’s license to use cannabis products for medical purposes.

However, since late 2020 gardai have been allowed to deal with simple cases of cannabis possession through an adult warning rather than through the courts, leading to a sharp drop in prosecutions. .

]]>
White House touts Biden marijuana pardons among administration’s ‘key accomplishments’ https://remedii.net/white-house-touts-biden-marijuana-pardons-among-administrations-key-accomplishments/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 16:47:09 +0000 https://remedii.net/white-house-touts-biden-marijuana-pardons-among-administrations-key-accomplishments/ The president’s mass marijuana pardons and directive on revised schedules are again touted by the White House as the “key accomplishments” of the Biden-Harris administration. As the end of President Joe Biden’s second year in office approaches, the White House has launched a webpage on “The Biden-Harris Record” that lists 17 major administration accomplishments, including […]]]>

The president’s mass marijuana pardons and directive on revised schedules are again touted by the White House as the “key accomplishments” of the Biden-Harris administration.

As the end of President Joe Biden’s second year in office approaches, the White House has launched a webpage on “The Biden-Harris Record” that lists 17 major administration accomplishments, including “ending our failed approach to marijuana”.

“To help address the failure of our nation’s approach to marijuana, including racial disparities, the President pardoned all previous federal offenses of simple possession of marijuana and urged governors to do the same. “, he indicates.

By the White House.

“The administration is also beginning the process of reviewing how marijuana is regulated under federal law. Marijuana is currently a Schedule I drug, the same classification as heroin and LSD and even higher than fentanyl and methamphetamine,” he said. keep on going.

Early in the administration, the president and vice president remained largely silent on cannabis policy issues after taking office, despite campaigning on a series of modest marijuana reforms like decriminalization and the rescheduling. But since Biden granted pardons last monththe administration has seized on the popularity of the action, particularly in the run-up to last week’s midterm elections.

Its inclusion in the list of “key achievements” is notable in the context of the other 16 achievements. For example, marijuana relief is listed right after accomplishments on issues such as student debt relief and reproduction and right before administration efforts to provide support to Ukraine amid Russian military aggression.

It should also be noted that action against cannabis was given its own separate category and was not grouped with another major achievement: “Advancing equity and racial justice, including historic justice reform criminal”.

Although the problems are linked – and the White House has link them recently in a statement on the steps that have been taken to uplift black Americans – the administration obviously wanted to put a particularly bright spotlight on the achievement of cannabis in the new list, as well as in related posts on Twitter.

Several surveys have shown that Biden’s marijuana leniency widely supported by the public, but advocates and some lawmakers have made it clear they want to see the administration go further.

For example, nine congressional lawmakers sent a letter to Biden on Monday, imploring him to extend its pardons to immigrants who have citizenship status issues. It is also urged to “prioritize” decriminalization or deprogramming.

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) formerly called for an extension of the president’s pardons, emphasizing the importance of having a Democratic Party that proactively defends Latin American communities, including the immigrant population. Part of that means adopting inclusive policies, she said, which was a missing element of the president’s mass cannabis pardon.

Earlier this month, more than 130 immigration and civil rights organizations sent a letter to Biden, also imploring him to extend his pardon proclamation for possession of marijuana. anyone, regardless of immigration status.

Biden’s mass pardon impacted about 6,500 people who have committed marijuana possession offenses at the federal level, as well as those who violated the law in Washington, D.C., but activists have argued that relief should also extend to people like immigrants and those with commercial beliefs.

Activists with Students for Sensible Drug Policy (SSDP), Last Prisoner Project (LPP) and DCMJ staged protests outside the White House last month to draw attention to this issue, demanding that Biden release the roughly 2,800 people currently being held in federal prison on marijuana convictions that are not limited to simple possession.

While Biden has has repeatedly touted his cannabis leniency actionsaying at one point that he has “changed the lives of thousands of people”, he strongly indicated that he is unwilling to provide further assistance for those with commercial convictions.

Meanwhile, the White House drug czar recently applauded Biden’s “historic” decision to grant a mass pardon for marijuana and to order an administrative review of the status of the drug formulary. And he again points out that there are “clear” medical benefits of cannabis – which he says should not be ignored due to separate concerns about youth use.

The Department of Justice and the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) have committed to promptly carrying out the separate review of the schedule the president has ordered, which could result in a recommendation to place cannabis on a lower schedule or phase it out altogether, thereby legalizing the plant under federal law.

HHS Secretary Xavier Becerra said officials will “work as quickly as possible” to complete the analysis Cannabis Programming as directed by the President.

The Justice Department, for its part, “will expeditiously administer the President’s Proclamation, which pardons those who engage in simple possession of marijuana, restoring the political, civil, and other rights of those convicted of this offense,” said said a department spokesperson.

Labor Secretary Marty Walsh said officials will work diligently to ensure people who have been pardoned for federal marijuana offenses under the presidential proclamation are not prevented from accessing future employment opportunities.

Vice President Kamala Harris said last month that voters should elect lawmakers who support marijuana reform so Congress can take a “one-size-fits-all approach” to the issue. in light of presidential cannabis pardons.

Congressional lawmakers seek federal bank data on marijuana company ownership to promote industry fairness

Marijuana Moment is made possible by the support of readers. If you rely on our cannabis advocacy journalism to stay informed, please consider a monthly Patreon Pledge.

]]>
Te Tauihu partnership aims to bring medical cannabis to Europe https://remedii.net/te-tauihu-partnership-aims-to-bring-medical-cannabis-to-europe/ Sat, 12 Nov 2022 23:49:00 +0000 https://remedii.net/te-tauihu-partnership-aims-to-bring-medical-cannabis-to-europe/ Aotearoa’s largest medical cannabis producer, Puro, has partnered with Nelson Medical Kiwi Company to export medical cannabis products to Europe. As part of this partnership, Puro will supply Medical Kiwi with five tons of cannabis flower in the first year, with the volume increasing in subsequent years. The flower will be dried at Medical Kiwi’s […]]]>

Aotearoa’s largest medical cannabis producer, Puro, has partnered with Nelson Medical Kiwi Company to export medical cannabis products to Europe.

As part of this partnership, Puro will supply Medical Kiwi with five tons of cannabis flower in the first year, with the volume increasing in subsequent years.

The flower will be dried at Medical Kiwi’s drying facility in Christchurch, with sales expected to begin next year.

In April, Puro, based in Marlborough received a $13 million government grant to strengthen New Zealand’s organic medicinal cannabis industry.

READ MORE:
* Medical cannabis company to pay $250,000 and offer to reimburse investors after misleading claims
* Medical cannabis company Medical Kiwi declined listing on NZX
* The country’s largest medicinal cannabis crop is taking shape

Puro Executive Chairman Tim Aldridge said the partnership is a good fit with Puro’s expertise in plant breeding and genetics, Medical Kiwi’s processing capacity and European customer relationships.

“There is huge global demand for high-quality pharmaceutical cannabis and our partnership with Medical Kiwi will help put New Zealand-grown medical cannabis on the world map,” said Aldridge.

Last year, Medical Kiwi admitted to making false statements during a crowdfunding campaign, breaching the fair dealing provisions of the Financial Markets Conduct Act.

]]> Judge tells drug cultivator he doesn’t like cannabis, before joking – ‘I’m not talking about my own personal use’ https://remedii.net/judge-tells-drug-cultivator-he-doesnt-like-cannabis-before-joking-im-not-talking-about-my-own-personal-use/ Thu, 10 Nov 2022 17:54:23 +0000 https://remedii.net/judge-tells-drug-cultivator-he-doesnt-like-cannabis-before-joking-im-not-talking-about-my-own-personal-use/
Judge Christopher Batty was dealing with used car salesman Owen Simmonds who admitted growing 21 cannabis plants at a property in Carlton Street, Horbury in May 2020. Few details of the case have been released and no mitigations have been heard at Leeds Crown Court this week, but a woman was confirmed to have been […]]]>

Judge Christopher Batty was dealing with used car salesman Owen Simmonds who admitted growing 21 cannabis plants at a property in Carlton Street, Horbury in May 2020.

Few details of the case have been released and no mitigations have been heard at Leeds Crown Court this week, but a woman was confirmed to have been dealt with in magistrates’ court last month after she admitted allowing the premises to be used for the cultivation of illegal drugs. She was fined £500.

Judge Batty told Simmonds, 31, of Church Lane Avenue, Wakefield, that he would suspend the inevitable prison sentence and said: ‘I don’t like cannabis…. I’m not talking about my own personal consumption, I have never tried.

The plants were found on the Carlton Street property in Horbury.

“It’s dangerous. It’s not good for people. I know people and I’ve heard stories in this court, especially from young people, in which it has affected their mental health.

“I frown on those who grow it or supply it, but I can take an exceptional course in this case.

“He crosses the guard threshold. This is a determined attempt to break the law.

Judge Batty said that after the defendant only received a fine, it would be unfair to send Simmonds straight into custody.

He sentenced him to nine months in prison, suspended for 12 months. He also told her to do 200 hours of unpaid labor and pay court fees.

]]>
Spain seizes the world’s largest cannabis transport to date, a dismantled group was supplying most of Europe https://remedii.net/spain-seizes-the-worlds-largest-cannabis-transport-to-date-a-dismantled-group-was-supplying-most-of-europe/ Sun, 06 Nov 2022 16:07:21 +0000 https://remedii.net/spain-seizes-the-worlds-largest-cannabis-transport-to-date-a-dismantled-group-was-supplying-most-of-europe/ Guardia Civil of Spain reported the confiscation of the largest shipment of packaged cannabis ever found in the world. Authorities said they seized more than 32 tons of cannabis, the equivalent of more than a million plants which they estimate to have a street value of more than $65 million. “Operation Jardines concluded with the […]]]>

Guardia Civil of Spain reported the confiscation of the largest shipment of packaged cannabis ever found in the world. Authorities said they seized more than 32 tons of cannabis, the equivalent of more than a million plants which they estimate to have a street value of more than $65 million.

“Operation Jardines concluded with the seizure of 32,370.2 kilograms of marijuana buds, the largest seizure of this substance, not only in Spain, but internationally. Its equivalence in complete plants would be approximately 1,100,000 specimens,” a police statement said Saturday.

The group of 20 people arrested by the police had “more than 32 tons of buds” stored in the Spanish cities of Toledo, Ciudad Real, Valencia and Asturias which they sold “through a complex commercial network”, which involved sending the cannabis under vacuum to all over Spain, as well as in Switzerland, Holland, Germany and Belgium, and other European countries.

La Guardia said the 20 people, men and women, in the cannabis operation controlled all production and distribution through various “companies” that carried out different parts of the process – from purchasing the seeds to the cultivation and drying of plants, including their packaging. and ship them.

Cannabis In Spain

Recreational use in Spain is decriminalized and allowed in private spaces, including the cultivation of a small number of cannabis plants if they are not visible from the outside. About 700 ago cannabis club across Spain, with some requiring membership fees or exclusive invitations to join. As supply and distribution remain illegal, this approach echoes the Dutch model.

Although many European countries have decriminalized small amounts of cannabis for recreational purposes, only one, Malta, has fully legalized it and Germany recently plans unveiled to legalize marijuana for adult use.

Canadian cannabis giants Tilray Brands Inc. (NASDAQ: TLRY) and Aurora Cannabis Inc. (NASDAQ: ACB) (TSX:ACB) are already well positioned to benefit from legalization in Germany, a country of more than 83 million people.

Spain, with its nearly 50 million inhabitants, should allow the sale of medical marijuana in pharmacies by the end of this year.

Photo taken by the author.

See more Benzinga

Don’t miss real-time alerts on your actions – join BenzingaPro free! Try the tool that will help you invest smarter, faster and better.

© 2022 Benzinga.com. Benzinga does not provide investment advice. All rights reserved.

]]>
Not all stores will skyrocket if Missouri legalizes recreational cannabis, but even flawed expansion is ‘well worth it’, advocates say https://remedii.net/not-all-stores-will-skyrocket-if-missouri-legalizes-recreational-cannabis-but-even-flawed-expansion-is-well-worth-it-advocates-say/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 19:53:56 +0000 https://remedii.net/not-all-stores-will-skyrocket-if-missouri-legalizes-recreational-cannabis-but-even-flawed-expansion-is-well-worth-it-advocates-say/ LRecreational marijuana equalization would have powerful results statewide if Missouri voters approve a constitutional amendment on Nov. 8, but some cannabis advocates and small-business owners say not all strains of success will be equal . On the one hand, Missouri Amendment 3 erase the criminal records of people who have previously been charged with non-violent […]]]>

LRecreational marijuana equalization would have powerful results statewide if Missouri voters approve a constitutional amendment on Nov. 8, but some cannabis advocates and small-business owners say not all strains of success will be equal .

On the one hand, Missouri Amendment 3 erase the criminal records of people who have previously been charged with non-violent marijuana and potentially de-stigmatize the industry; and secondly, the amendment caps the number of licenses to grow and sell cannabis. The latter makes it difficult for many small business owners to access legal marijuana operations, said Rich Dunfield, founder and owner of Native Hemp Co. — a CBD store located in Lee’s Summit, Missouri.

RELATED: Voters in some of the most conservative states to weigh in on the recreational pot

“I understand that for the average Missouri resident, this Amendment 3 probably really works, and that’s great,” Dunfield noted. “But there is another aspect to this that I would have preferred to have had the option of making more licenses available. I have been working in cannabis every day for five years and would be considered a successful small cannabis business. I have no chance of buying a license.

Click on here to learn more about Rich Dunfield’s entrepreneurial journey with Native Hemp Co.

Since Missouri legalized medical marijuana in 2018, the state has issued approximately 200 dispensary licenses and 65 cultivation licenses. Under Amendment 3, a minimum of 144 new licenses will be issued; it prioritizes those who already have medical licenses and have the highest capital, Dunfield explained.

“I understand why they drafted the bill this way. This is one of the biggest investments the state will make, and they want to minimize risk by working with people with big money,” Dunfield said. “However, they also downplay innovation and fairness with this mindset.

“…A lot of people come together – so if there’s a person with money, then a great thinker and a good operator, that’s often how companies come together,” he said. he continued. “I would like to see room for small shops that do everything on their own because, again, that’s how innovation happens.”

Michael Wilson, Franklin’s Hideout

Teaming up is exactly how Michael Wilson and Ronald Rice co-founded Franklin’s hideout, a manufacturer of cannabis products that supplies dispensaries in Missouri. The entrepreneurial duo secured one of the last medical marijuana licenses in Missouri after connecting with a business broker and raising much-needed capital in less than three months, Wilson recalled.

Ronald Rice, Franklin's Hideout

Ronald Rice, Franklin’s Hideout

“It’s virtually unheard of to go and raise $2 million in capital in less than 90 days and then apply it to build an entire manufacturing facility in less than four months,” Wilson said, noting that most companies must spend between 10 million dollars. $30 million to enter the market. “Everyone involved with us is very pro-entrepreneur and really supportive.”

The Franklin’s Stash House team is based in Kansas City, Missouri. It is made up of 12 people, which is the smallest team that Wilson would recommend for those with a license to manufacture infused products.

“The average team is 20 to 25 people, and then a large culture requires, on average, 25 to 50 people,” Wilson said. “We certainly want to see more people with licenses, but I would ask that people understand that this regulatory environment is like a pharmaceutical facility and a high-quality food factory – and that comes at a cost. You have to fundraise for lawyers, accountants, and regulatory experts, so it’s not possible to do a one-man or one-woman show in Missouri.

Click on here to learn more about Franklin’s Stash House.

Micro business licenses

Amendment 3 also includes a micro-enterprise licensing program for disadvantaged people looking to grow or sell recreational marijuana. According to the amendment, micro-enterprises would only be allowed to work with other micro-enterprises. Micro-enterprise licenses will be allocated through a lottery process. The criteria for who can apply for the microenterprise license are still uncertain.

“We don’t know enough [the microbusiness licensing program] to see if it helps our business in any way, but I really hope it helps other people get in on this game,” Dunfield said.

Wilson co-founder Rice is eager to connect with those who obtain micro-enterprise licenses and provide them with the education and resources his team needed to succeed, he shared.

“We are very passionate about the success of micro-licensing,” Rice said. “We spend a lot of energy training entrepreneurs and the next generation of micro-licensing.”

RELATED: Will Missouri Voters Make Weed Legal This Election? Amendment 3 is not so simple

Economic impacts

Missouri’s planned 6% recreational marijuana tax is expected to bring in millions of dollars in revenue for the state. The cannabis industry presents a whole new look at the economy, Wilson said.

“You have to consider that this is a new industry that has been invested in and that [Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services] has to handle it,” Wilson said. “It won’t be perfect because you’re talking about a giant bureaucracy running something that’s a new industry.

“Ultimately, you can’t issue more licenses right now because there’s not enough demand until marijuana becomes recreational,” he continued. “When demand exceeds supply, DHSS can take a look and see if there’s anyone micro-licensing they want to bring in or if they want to issue more licenses. When we see mismanagement, we see a total collapse of the industry which then needs to be completely overhauled.

Oklahoma, one of Missouri’s neighboring states, legalized medical marijuana in 2018. Oklahoma’s low barrier to entry – around $2,500 to obtain a license – led to the opening of an unprecedented number of dispensaries across the state. This has led to companies selling out of state, which violates state and federal laws and is considered black market marijuana. State officials asked $4 million to fight illegal farms and businesses.

Rich Dunfield, Native Hemp Co.

If Amendment 3 passes, Dunfield acknowledged that small shops like his are likely to face intense competition from dispensaries that sell recreational marijuana.

“We will always do what we do – which is to make all the high quality cannabinoids that we are licensed to make from the hemp plant,” Dunfield said. “For every other store open, I think there will be as many people interested in cannabis. And the competition may encourage us to be more innovative, but that’s not something that scares me.

“We have the ability to sell more than marijuana, cannabis and hemp,” he continued. “We can have lineups like cocoa drinks, mushrooms, certain vitamins and mineral ratios in cold drinks and baked goods. Customers will likely see us transform more and more into a cafe and bar that focuses on these active ingredients with very personalized customer service.

RELATED: Credit Laws Could Slow Potential Missouri Marijuana Industry Boom

More cannabis users in (and out of) Missouri

Steve Gardner, House of Kush

For Steve Gardner, the co-founder of House of Kush, Amendment 3 is a way for him to expand his business in Missouri. Although House of Kush is based in Kansas City, Missouri, the company is focused on licensing, marketing, and branding across the country and beyond.

“We do business in eight other states and three foreign countries — Israel, Austria and Germany — but we’ve started looking at the Missouri market and identifying who we’d like to work with,” Gardner said. “I was born and raised in Kansas City, so I love this city and it will be even better when [marijuana] becomes recreational.

As a longtime advocate for cannabis use, Gardner hopes the potential legalization of recreational marijuana will change the narrative around the cannabis industry, he shared.

“Having worked with many professional athletes, I’ve seen many of them use it after their playing careers have ended for joint pain, head trauma, sleep issues and all the other issues they were meeting,” Gardner said. “I hope this helps people understand the very real medical benefits this herb brings to people.”

Gary Upah, Hemp Soggy Bottom

On the Kansas side, Gary Upah, founder of Soggy Bottom Hempbelieves Missouri’s election can push legalization beyond state lines.

“There’s talk now that if Missouri becomes recreational, with the state line dividing Kansas City down the middle, there’s absolutely no way we can keep marijuana out of Kansas,” Upah said. “I think this will force Kansas’ hand to at least take the discussion seriously.”

Ultimately, if Missouri voters decide to pass Amendment 3, it will give more people access to marijuana, Wilson said.

“Whether the amendment is perfect or not perfect today is going to take time to change,” Wilson said. “To me, postponing legalization is postponing a patient’s ability to obtain a more affordable and accessible product. The number of people who can be cured and have peace of mind thanks to cannabis is well worth the effort.

This story is possible thanks to the support of the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundationa private, non-partisan foundation that works with communities in education and entrepreneurship to create unusual solutions and empower people to shape their future and succeed.

For more information, visit www.kauffman.org and log in to www.twitter.com/kauffmanfdn and www.facebook.com/kauffmanfdn

]]>
Aldus. Bobby Burns launches new marijuana business https://remedii.net/aldus-bobby-burns-launches-new-marijuana-business/ Fri, 28 Oct 2022 09:05:47 +0000 https://remedii.net/aldus-bobby-burns-launches-new-marijuana-business/ Eighteen years ago, cannabis was illegal in most of the United States, and Ald. Bobby Burns (5th grade) was a student at Evanston Township High School who occasionally smoked marijuana with his friends. Today, recreational cannabis is legal in Illinois, and Burns is the alderman for the 5th district on the city council. He became […]]]>

Eighteen years ago, cannabis was illegal in most of the United States, and Ald. Bobby Burns (5th grade) was a student at Evanston Township High School who occasionally smoked marijuana with his friends.

Today, recreational cannabis is legal in Illinois, and Burns is the alderman for the 5th district on the city council. He became a pioneer of a more progressive approach to recreational drug regulation – and a young entrepreneur in Illinois’ cannabis industry.

Three months after his election in April 2021, Burns’ company, Herban Garden, was awarded one of the first 40 homegrown marijuana licenses in the state. Burns hopes to build an eco-friendly greenhouse in Chicago, where his team can grow the crop and sell produce at dispensaries.

“I realized that I needed to be part of this industry so that I could help ensure, even through my participation, that marginalized groups and minority groups are represented in the industry,” Burns said.

The path has not been easy for Burns. Still, he said the experience was a lesson in the realities of business and politics — from funding a startup in an evolving industry to eliminating cannabis testing for Evanston employees.

Growing pains

At 36, Burns says he no longer uses cannabis, but he recognizes its benefits.

“I’ve always understood cannabis and appreciated its ability to heal and help people manage their stress levels,” he said.

He also works to make the new industry more inclusive and address the inequities of Illinois’ past drug policies that disproportionately affected marginalized groups. According to the American Civil Liberties Union, black people were 7.5 times more likely than white people to be arrested for possession of cannabis in Illinois when the plant was illegal.

Although Burns’ goals were vast, the details of building Herban Garden proved difficult.

Applicants for craft growth must present a detailed plan explaining how they will ensure the safety of their installation and develop the factory in a coherent way, as well as how the business will ultimately be profitable. Most applications are over 100 pages.

Burns enlisted Justice Cannabis Co., a Chicago-based multistate cannabis company that promotes inclusivity, for free assistance in filing the claim. The company has helped many candidate groups in the process.

Cole Eastman, an attorney on Burns’ team, said some candidates pay consultants up to six figures for help.

“Just because your grow plan says you know how to grow cannabis doesn’t mean the owners of this company know how to grow cannabis,” Eastman said.

Herban Garden also applied for the license as a social equity candidate – a program designed to reduce barriers to industry. To qualify, a majority owner of the business must be an Illinois resident who lives in an area disproportionately affected by cannabis-related arrests, has been arrested for a cannabis-related offense, or has a member of his or her family who was arrested for a cannabis-related offence. .

Illinois also gives preference to veteran-owned businesses. To qualify as a social equity candidate, Burns tapped his uncle, Reginald Burns, as the majority owner. A Vietnam veteran, his uncle is also from Englewood, Chicago, which has a black population of over 90%.

When Herban Garden got the license in July 2021, Eastman said he was speechless.

“I couldn’t work the rest of the day,” he said. “I didn’t know what to do with myself. It was really exciting.

Raise seed capital

After obtaining a license, Herban Garden struggled to raise funds and get the business operational.

Burns said that if the company doesn’t raise the $10 million needed to launch it, it will either sell its license or merge with a larger cannabis company, defeating its goal of creating an independently owned company. to a minority.

Evanston native Asia Lustig, a former Justice Cannabis Co. employee who met Burns when she was an intern for the city, is co-owner of Herban Garden.

“These licenses are considered a golden ticket to making money, and that’s really not true if you don’t already have money,” Lustig said.

Herban Garden was conditionally approved a year ago for the state’s Social Equity Cannabis Loan Program, which provides low-interest loans to social equity applicants. But Eastman said the company still hasn’t received the loan.

Burns applied for a property in the Pullman neighborhood of Chicago for his greenhouse. It is eligible for the Chicago Recovery Grant, which aims to fund local development in disadvantaged neighborhoods. Herban Garden has yet to hear about the grant.

Craft growers in Illinois are initially allowed a maximum of 5,000 square feet for cannabis plants. Growers may eventually obtain approval from the Illinois Department of Agriculture to increase in 3,000 square foot increments, with a maximum of 14,000 square feet.

Scott Redman, founder of the Illinois Independent Craft Growers Association, said this rule makes it difficult to start a profitable business quickly.

“People say, ‘Oh, that’s just weed,'” Redman said. “But no, it’s about growing a very specific plant to very specific, high standards…the end product has to be as consistent as pharmaceuticals.”

Collect new ideas

Along with Burns, cannabis is also of particular importance to Evanston as a whole: the city’s 3% tax on recreational cannabis funds its initial repair program, the Restorative Housing Program.

However, only 16 of the 132 eligible recipients were paid within the first series of repairs payments, which give each person $25,000 to use for property purchases, mortgage payments or home repairs. Evanston currently has only one dispensary: ​​Zen Leaf on Maple Avenue.

Burns, a member of the Reparations Committee, said Evanston should use the program to encourage dispensaries to open in the city.

“We’ve tied the success of cannabis to this important social initiative, which gives us every incentive to not only get you here, but also to make sure you succeed,” he said.

Burns said it was difficult for craft growers to get started in Evanston due to the lack of empty warehouse space for grow facilities. Evanston’s cannabis tax only applies to sales at city dispensaries.

With his company, Burns hopes to prove that local politicians can balance public service with other jobs. Burns said council members’ $15,990 annual salary and lack of funds for aldermen to hire staff make it difficult for low- and middle-income candidates to justify their candidacy.

Burns also wants to “tackle the stigma” around cannabis users – something he’s been pushing as a representative of the 5th Ward.

In May, city council passed a resolution proposed by Burns that eliminated cannabinoid screening for candidates employed by the city. The revised parameters, which were passed on Monday, allow cannabinoid testing for “security-sensitive” positions and “cases of reasonable suspicion.”

Burns said his ultimate goal is to create an environmentally sustainable business that educates users about responsible cannabis use.

“Even places like Evanston still won’t allow you to show up completely — with some level of nanograms in your system,” Burns said. “We want to educate people about the power of this powerhouse and how to use it responsibly, so they can continue to do the work they want to do.”

E-mail: [email protected]

Twitter: @saullpink

Related stories:

City Council allocates additional cannabis tax funding to reparations program

Bobby Burns expected to win Ward’s 5th race

As Legal Cannabis Goes Into Force, Proponents of Medical Cannabis and Social Equity Worry

]]>
Major marijuana companies are failing in state legalization efforts, South Dakota campaign says, as another poll shows initiative lagging https://remedii.net/major-marijuana-companies-are-failing-in-state-legalization-efforts-south-dakota-campaign-says-as-another-poll-shows-initiative-lagging/ Tue, 25 Oct 2022 20:09:01 +0000 https://remedii.net/major-marijuana-companies-are-failing-in-state-legalization-efforts-south-dakota-campaign-says-as-another-poll-shows-initiative-lagging/ With another poll showing a ballot initiative on marijuana legalization in South Dakota lagging behind, a high-profile activist is calling out the national cannabis industry for pumping money into “expensive fanciful lobbyists of DC” who have achieved “virtually nothing” at the federal level while state campaigns are “starved” of resources. The KELOLAND News, Emerson College […]]]>

With another poll showing a ballot initiative on marijuana legalization in South Dakota lagging behind, a high-profile activist is calling out the national cannabis industry for pumping money into “expensive fanciful lobbyists of DC” who have achieved “virtually nothing” at the federal level while state campaigns are “starved” of resources.

The KELOLAND News, Emerson College and The Hill survey released Tuesday shows 51% of South Dakotans plan to vote against the legalization measure next month, while 40% said they would support it and 10% remain undecided. .

Those numbers indicate the reform measure could meet a different fate than when state voters approved a legalization initiative in 2020, only to have it struck down by the courts.

There is little time left for South Dakotans for Better Marijuana Laws (SDBML) to convince the undecided and sway the opponents. But the campaign says its ability to reach voters this cycle has been limited by a lack of interest and financial contributions from big cannabis companies.

SDBML director Matthew Schweich, who is also the deputy director of the National Marijuana Policy Project, told Marijuana Moment on Tuesday that in general, “predicting who is going to run for office has never been so difficult.” And while the campaign isn’t convinced that recent polls accurately reflect voter sentiment toward the initiative, it has felt largely ignored by the industry as more resources pour into Washington, D.C.

“I believe we’re going to have a good result on Election Day despite these polls,” Schweich said. “Our goal is to work hard, which we have been doing for the past year.”

But that hard work costs money — something fewer major marijuana brands seem willing to offer to the state-level effort. Schweich said 70% of campaign funding came from South Dakota businesses, which “underscores the fact that there is no longer any national philanthropic support for cannabis reform.”

“The future of cannabis reform ballot initiatives will be 100% industry funded,” he said. “I am deeply frustrated with the biggest cannabis companies in this country, who wasted their money on DC lobbyists and got next to nothing. Meanwhile, reforms at the state level are starved even though all of our progress has been at the state level.

“Thousands of dollars are wasted on federal efforts that should have been directed to the state level,” he said. “They have their priorities upside down.”

Even with Democratic majorities in the current Congress, no substantive marijuana reform legislation has been enacted despite increased industry lobbying. The House has twice passed a cannabis legalization bill and seven times approved legislation on marijuana banks, but the proposals are stalled in the Senate under the scrutiny of Democrats and Republicans.

That said, leadership is should table a set of incremental reforms during the lame duck session after the election, and many hope that the bipartisan, bicameral negotiations will produce something passable that can be sent to President Joe Biden’s office before the session ends.

Campaign finance records that were submitted on Monday show SDBML raised $492,647 from May 19 to October 19, with the bulk of that ($436,000) coming from businesses, 75% of which are based in the South Dakota.

“South Dakota-based cannabis businesses have ramped up,” Schweich said. But the same cannot be said for big-dollar domestic cannabis companies and stakeholders, he argued.

“I’m the guy in the trenches who does five different jobs and hasn’t had a day off since August. Sometimes I wish I was a DC lobbyist who had to take three meetings a week and have every weekend to spend with my family,” he said. “I choose to fight the good fight.”

Another factor working against the campaign is the fact that they are running this initiative during a midterm election year, rather than a year with the presidency on the ticket, when younger, more liberal voters tend to stand at the polls.

Conservative voters are more likely to dominate the midterm elections, and the new poll shows why that could be seriously problematic for the campaign. The majority of Democrats (59%) and independents (54%) say they will vote for the Measure 27 Initiative. But 66% of Republicans say they will vote against it.

The investigation involved interviews with a sample of likely voters from October 19 to 21, with a margin of error of +/- 2.4 percentage points. This is the third survey in a row showing legalization measure behind as the elections are fast approaching.

Despite the polls and the limited budget, Schweich says, “I still believe we’re going to win this campaign.”

SDBML also recently launched a new ad it reminds South Dakotans how a lawsuit led by Gov. Kristi Noem (R) ultimately led the state Supreme Court to strike down a 2020 voter-approved legalization measure. The court sided with the administration that the earlier initiative violated the single-subject ballot rule.

Meanwhile, opponents have also released an ad that aims to stoke fears about the impact of legalization on children, starting with a narrator showing a video of children and saying “these are future drug addicts, future victims of suicide, future victims of an impaired driver”.

The Legalization Campaign announced separately this month that it was kick off a 10-day statewide tour to register voters and inform the electorate about the initiative.

Activists have already cleared a major hurdle by submitting enough valid signatures to qualify the marijuana measure for the November ballot. They turned in nearly 20,000, and the Secretary of State’s office confirmed in May that they had reached the 16,961 signatures required for ballot placement.

To avoid the single subject issue that led to the invalidation of the 2020 initiative, the 2022 measure omits the provisions of the previous version that dealt with taxes and regulations, leaving those decisions to the legislature.

While the governor has worked more recently to align with the state’s medical cannabis program, despite previously opposing the two 2020 cannabis measures, she said in August that she was committed to do his job and see through the implementation of recreational legalization if voters approve of it this year.

She said the 2022 measure “is more appropriately drafted constitutionally,” signaling that she would not subject it to another legal challenge.

But the idea that Noem, who vetoed a modest hemp reform bill in 2019 and actively urged voters to oppose the adult use measure in TV ads the following year – now content to implement legalization if voters approve of it raised some eyebrows.

House Minority Leader Jamie Smith (D), who is the Democratic nominee challenging the governor this year, also blamed Noem for his earlier efforts to interfere with voter-approved legalization, posting ads in August. who remind voters of the interference.

A poll released in December 2021 found that most South Dakota voters approved of Noem’s overall performance, but only 39% supported his handling of marijuana legalizationwith 51% disapproval.

Noem tried to get the legislator to approve a bill to delay implementation of the medical cannabis program for another year, but although he cleared the House, negotiators were unable to reach an agreement with the Senate in conference, delivering a defeat to the governor.

In response, his office began exploring a compromise last yearwith a proposal that came out of his administration to decriminalize possession of up to one ounce of cannabis, limit the number of plants patients can grow to three, and bar those under 21 from qualifying for medical marijuana.


Marijuana time is tracked over 1,500 cannabis, psychedelics and drug bills in state legislatures and in Congress this year. Patreon supporters by pledging at least $25/month, access our interactive maps, charts, and audience calendar so they don’t miss a thing.

Learn more about our marijuana bill tracker and become a support on Patreon to gain access.

Following the court ruling that invalidated the previous victory at the polls, campaigners have decided to take a two-track approach to policy change in 2022, both working with lawmakers for legislative reform while raising separately from signatures for the ballot initiative if lawmakers fail to act.

While they would have preferred lawmakers to pass the policy change, that did not materialize this session. The House rejected a legalization bill passed by the Senate in March, effectively leaving it up to activists to stand at the polls again.

The SDBML said it intended to work with lawmakers on the measure while continuing to push for the ballot measure.

Here’s what the campaign’s marijuana legalization poll initiative would accomplish if approved by the voters:

The measure would allow adults 21 and older to purchase and possess up to one ounce of cannabis. They could also grow up to three plants for personal use.

It also provides for civil penalties for violating provisions related to matters such as public consumption or the cultivation of more plants than permitted.

Employers would be specifically allowed to continue to enforce the workplace drug policy prohibiting the use of cannabis by workers.

State and local governments could continue to prohibit marijuana-related activities made legal under the initiative in buildings “owned, leased or occupied” by a government agency.

The measure does not touch on regulatory policies regarding the taxation of cannabis sales, licensing or equity.

An Interim Marijuana Study Committee, led by legislative leaders, was created last year to explore cannabis policy reform, and the group ultimately recommended that the legislature take legalization this session. The bill rejected by the House was one of the direct products of this recommendation.

German government changes marijuana legalization proposal after restrictions rejected

Photo courtesy of Mike Latimer.

Marijuana Moment is made possible by the support of readers. If you rely on our cannabis advocacy journalism to stay informed, please consider a monthly Patreon Pledge.

]]>
This 12-time NBA star makes plant-based auto parts and predicts ‘all plastics will be made from cannabis’ – Stellantis (NYSE:STLA), One World Products (OTC:OWPC) https://remedii.net/this-12-time-nba-star-makes-plant-based-auto-parts-and-predicts-all-plastics-will-be-made-from-cannabis-stellantis-nysestla-one-world-products-otcowpc/ Sat, 22 Oct 2022 18:12:00 +0000 https://remedii.net/this-12-time-nba-star-makes-plant-based-auto-parts-and-predicts-all-plastics-will-be-made-from-cannabis-stellantis-nysestla-one-world-products-otcowpc/ By Javier Hasse and Nicolas Jose Rodriguez. “I envision a future where the Fords, GMs, Stellantis of the world take plastics out of their automobiles and infuse them with industrial hemp to replace those plastics, reducing their carbon footprint,” says NBA star Isiah Thomas , cannabis entrepreneur and CEO of products of a world OWPCthe […]]]>

By Javier Hasse and Nicolas Jose Rodriguez.

“I envision a future where the Fords, GMs, Stellantis of the world take plastics out of their automobiles and infuse them with industrial hemp to replace those plastics, reducing their carbon footprint,” says NBA star Isiah Thomas , cannabis entrepreneur and CEO of products of a world OWPCthe largest black licensed and controlled hemp and cannabis producer in Colombia.

While that might sound innovative, even in 2022 hemp cars were actually a reality some 80 years before. In 1941, Henry Ford presented a prototype car with a body made primarily from plant-derived materials like soybeans, wheat, hemp, and flax. To go even further, Ford asked Rudolf Diesel, inventor of the diesel engine, to develop a special and unique propulsion system for this car: the vehicle would also run on vegetable oil and hemp.

These days, Thomas’ company is also working on hemp auto parts. According to a recent agreement with Stellantide STLAThe world’s sixth-largest automaker, owner of Chrysler, Citroen, Dodge, Fiat, Jeep, Peugeot and other portfolio brands, One World Products will develop and supply hemp-based bioplastic components for car interiors and exteriors.

Hemp glasses by Hemp, COURTESY

According to a recent reporthemp is not only a greener option than traditional plastics, which would help limit the automotive industry’s massive impact on CO2 emissionsbut it is also stronger than steel and lighter than fiberglass. Additionally, many hemp plastics are completely biodegradablemaking their production close to carbon neutral.

While the hemp materials space isn’t quite crowded yet, a few other companies have also recognized its potential. In Argentina, a brand called Hemp makes the most beautiful hemp glasses you’ve ever seen. Similarly, Nebraska’s Hemp3D, which also makes eyewear, recently launched a hemp chess set. And the American company Santa Cruz Shredder also uses hemp plastics to make cannabis accessories.

In 2019, CEO of CBD Elixinol Global, Paul Benhaim, spear the Hemp Plastic Company, with the intention of using waste from the former’s CBD production to make hemp-based bioplastics. The Hemp Foundation does something similar. Meanwhile, Sana Packaging uses hemp and reclaimed plastics to make sustainable packaging for cannabis businesses.

Examples like these abound, and one thing is clear: the planet needs sustainable plastics, and these early entrants stand to benefit from this trend.

The Afro-Colombian Connection and Isiah’s Hemp Cars

“Think of us as the supplier of hemp and cannabis raw materials to the industry. We grow and we cultivate in Colombia because of the equatorial advantages it gives us, we work with indigenous farmers and we work with the soil and the sun. Not only in the CBD space but also in the hemp space,” Thomas explained in an exclusive interview at an event in Miami.

“We work closely with the automotive industry to reduce their carbon footprint by replacing some of their plastics with hemp, we also work in construction. As far as plastic is concerned, everything will be made of hemp and we want to be the biggest supplier of it. Not only can you use hemp to build the car, but also for fuel, food, and plastics.

In May, One World Products and AMUNAFRO, the National Association of Mayors of Municipalities with Afro-Colombian populations, announced that they had reached an agreement Partnership control over one million acres in Colombia to focus on industrial hemp production. One World will produce hemp and hemp derivatives in association with local farmers to supply the automotive industry, among others, with plastic substitutes.

Thomas delved into issues such as the need for a global productive transition to sustainable agriculture and manufacturing and reducing the carbon footprint. Additionally, the CEO noted Colombia’s comparative advantages for growing hemp, including its people, soil, and equatorial lighting.

“This factory is also a one-stop-shop for the world. You have to have the supply to meet the demand (…) [and] we are looking to supply industries looking to make ‘the big change’,” he added.

Austin Bryant, chief executive of BastCore Inc., an 8-year-old company that converts hemp stalks into industrial materials like textiles, building materials, composites, oilfield chemicals and more, appears to share the vision. of Thomas. When asked about the issue, the hemp expert – who is in no way affiliated with One World Products, said he and his team are “big believers in the important and worthwhile work of Isiah “.

“Industrial hemp is a carbon sequestration juggernaut,” he explained. “For every acre of hemp grown, 9 tons of CO2 are captured. If we could get 1 million acres of hemp in our soil and harvest three times a year (hemp has a 90 day growth cycle), you’re capturing a fair amount of carbon. Replacing synthetic fibers made from fossil fuels with plant-based fibers will allow brands to reach their climate goals faster. The big picture is to reduce the emission rate of the United States, which is certainly worth investing in. »

Local farmers: a vital asset for the cannabis industry

For Thomas, human resources are vital for the production of high quality goods, including hemp. Fortunately, he was able to build on his experience in champagne, an industry where he has already found success with his brand Cheurlin Champagne.

Local know-how can help anticipate bottlenecks in the cannabis business supply chain, innovate and differentiate products, improve resource use and research, and preserve local culture and the environment.

“I hadn’t realized I was entering agricultural space when I entered champagne. I learned that the soil, the sun and the farmers make the best grapes. When I wanted to move in the field of cannabis, to understand the business you know… the endocannabinoid system, THC, etc, it became [a question of] “Where is the best place where we can get the best of the best at the lowest price?” And Colombia hit all the targets,” Thomas said.

The former NBA player also noted that the company anticipates a global political trend in the design of goods and consumer habits, that of sustainable materials with a negative carbon footprint.

“About the uses of hemp, we talk about its thousands of applications. This is a great opportunity for us and for the world. We believe that as the world continues to seek to reduce the carbon footprint, the world will go back to a natural place, the uses of hemp and what it can do on all levels,” Thomas explained.

The “THC side”

As a former athlete, Thomas is excited about cannabinoids and what they can do to help with pain, sleep, and inflammation. He believes cannabinoids have been rendered invisible by negative propaganda, despite people having been using them for millennia.

“I think people have always known instinctively how effective this plant is. I thank those present at the conference for their diligence, perseverance, and efforts to educate people about the benefits [of cannabis] because it works naturally with your body,” added the CEO. “When I look at it from an educational point of view, the fascinating thing that I discovered, when you look at Colombia, you have the Caribbean, you have the Atlantic and you have the Pacific. The cultural differences come together to learning how to use the earth for medicinal purposes, for food purposes, it’s really unique, one plant does everything.

– Cannabis is particularly stigmatized in the world of sport, how to overcome this?

We have to understand that the factory has been put to sleep here in the industry so that other synthetic and drug industries can develop. And understand how the United States operates from a business perspective. And give credit to these companies for the propaganda they used against the factory and misinformation. Commercially, they have done their job. But that’s the beauty of the plant. Factory says your time is up.

Encuentra nuestro contenido en español en El Planteo: Isiah Thomas Elogia a Ginóbili: ‘Verdaderamente Amo a Manu’

follow me on Twitter Where LinkedIn. Check out my website or some of my other work here.

This article was originally published on Forbes and appears here with permission.

]]>