Cannabis News – Remedii http://remedii.net/ Thu, 13 Jan 2022 21:52:15 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://remedii.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2-150x150.png Cannabis News – Remedii http://remedii.net/ 32 32 Delta 8 now illegal in Kansas, but medical marijuana could be on the way https://remedii.net/delta-8-now-illegal-in-kansas-but-medical-marijuana-could-be-on-the-way/ Thu, 13 Jan 2022 21:52:15 +0000 https://remedii.net/delta-8-now-illegal-in-kansas-but-medical-marijuana-could-be-on-the-way/ KANSAS CITY, Mo. — The Delta 8 debate leaves some confused and others unlucky. It comes from hemp and cannabis plants. A recent court decision in the state of Kansas changed its classification to a controlled substance. Kansas Democrats could lose congressional seat with redistricting plans You’ve probably seen signs, advertisements and flags along the […]]]>

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — The Delta 8 debate leaves some confused and others unlucky. It comes from hemp and cannabis plants. A recent court decision in the state of Kansas changed its classification to a controlled substance.

You’ve probably seen signs, advertisements and flags along the route for Delta 8 on the subway. In Missouri, it’s legal. You can use it without any problem. However, in Kansas it could be considered possession depending on the counties interest in prosecuting it.

This is not a new strain of COVID or an airliner. It is part of the cannabis plant with milder side effects.

“It’s called weed’s little brother, or diet weed, if you will. It has intoxicating effects, but they’re much milder,” said KC Hemp Co. co-owner Heather Steppe.

KC Hemp Co. is an online store focused on CBD products. Steppe started the business with her husband. She is also part of the Kansas Chamber of Cannabis Commerce.

“Whether Delta Eight is legal or illegal in Kansas very much depends on who you talk to, and maybe even what county you’re in,” said criminal defense attorney Patrick Lewis. .

Lewis practices in Johnson County and is a member of the National Organization for Marijuana Law Reform.

Delta 8 is illegal in Kansas and how it became so is about as complicated as explaining Delta 8 itself. In western Kansas, the Ellis County prosecutor pursued a case involving Delta 8. He says he asked the attorney general’s office for advice but didn’t get much response. The outcome of the case classified Delta 8 as a controlled substance.

“They’re using that language as an opportunity to try to charge people with possession of a controlled substance, and the Ellis County attorney is the one who kind of set that ball in motion,” Steppe said.

On December 2, Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt issued an advisory saying it is illegal to possess and sell in Kansas if it contains less than 0.3% THC.

“There are 17 different municipalities in Johnson County, and they could go any direction they wanted. It’s really a question of whether the prosecutor in that jurisdiction, does the police in that jurisdiction want to try to take over the subject? Lewis said.

Steppe said they no longer sell Delta 8 to Kansas customers and she hopes to see medical marijuana legalized in the state this year.

“During the offseason, we had a lot of time to educate lawmakers. And that’s really the problem. This is the problem and the solution. There’s a lot of misinformation, there’s a lot of lack of education,” Steppe said.

Steppe is hosting an online conversation about Delta 8 in Kansas and what you need to know on January 16 at 7 p.m. via Zoom.

Medical marijuana is under consideration in the Kansas Senate. It passed the House of Representatives last year. It’s unclear when a decision may be made, but if it passes Kansas, it would be the 38th state in the nation to approve medical marijuana.

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Research describes brain-based method to identify cannabis impairment – Harvard Gazette https://remedii.net/research-describes-brain-based-method-to-identify-cannabis-impairment-harvard-gazette/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 20:39:23 +0000 https://remedii.net/research-describes-brain-based-method-to-identify-cannabis-impairment-harvard-gazette/ Researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital have found that a non-invasive brain imaging procedure is an objective and reliable way to identify people whose performance has been impaired by THC, the psychoactive ingredient in cannabis. The technique uses imaging technology known as near infrared functional spectroscopy (fNIRS) to measure patterns of brain activation that correlate with […]]]>

Researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital have found that a non-invasive brain imaging procedure is an objective and reliable way to identify people whose performance has been impaired by THC, the psychoactive ingredient in cannabis.

The technique uses imaging technology known as near infrared functional spectroscopy (fNIRS) to measure patterns of brain activation that correlate with impaired THC intoxication. As reported in the journal Neuropsychopharmacology, the procedure could have important implications for improving road and occupational safety.

The increased use of cannabis through legalization has created the urgent need for a portable brain imaging procedure that can distinguish between impairment and mild THC poisoning.

“Our research represents a new direction for field impairment testing,” says lead author Jodi Gilman, researcher at the Center for Addiction Medicine, MGH and associate professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. “Our goal was to determine if cannabis impairment could be detected from brain activity at the individual level. This is a critical issue because a “breathalyzer” type approach will not work to detect cannabis impairment, making it very difficult to objectively assess THC impairment during a traffic stop. . “

THC has been shown in previous studies to impair cognitive and psychomotor performance essential for safe driving, a factor believed to at least double the risk of fatal traffic accidents. The challenge for scientists, however, is that the concentration of THC in the body does not correspond well with functional impairment. One of the reasons is that people who use cannabis can often have high levels of THC in the body and not be altered. Another is that THC metabolites can remain in the blood for weeks after the last cannabis use, well beyond the period of intoxication. Hence the need for a different method to determine impairment from cannabis intoxication.

In the MGH study, 169 cannabis users underwent fNIRS brain imaging before and after receiving oral THC or placebo. Participants who reported poisoning after receiving oral THC showed an increased concentration of oxygenated hemoglobin (HbO) – a type of neural activity signature in the prefrontal cortex region of the brain – compared to those who reported little or no poisoning.

“The identification of an acute impairment due to THC poisoning through portable brain imaging could be an essential tool in the hands of police officers in the field”, explains lead author and lead researcher A. Eden Evins, founding director of the Center for Addiction Medicine. “The accuracy of this method was confirmed by the fact that impairment was determined by machine learning models using only information from the fNIRS self-report and clinical assessment of impairment in 76 % time. “

Although the study did not specifically assess the fNIRS in roadside impaired driving assessments, it cited considerable benefits for such an application. These include the feasibility of inexpensive, lightweight, battery-powered fNIRS devices that can store data on portable recording units or transmit it wirelessly to a laptop computer. In addition, the fNIRS technology could be incorporated into a headband or cap, and therefore requires minimal installation time.

“Companies are developing breathalysers that only measure cannabis exposure, but not cannabis impairment,” says Gilman. “We need a method that will not penalize medical marijuana users or others with insufficient amounts of cannabis in their system to adversely affect their performance. While it requires further study, we believe brain-based testing could provide an objective, practical, and much-needed solution. “

Evins is the Cox family professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School.

The study was funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse.

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Women Using Cannabis For Endometriosis Relief | Bega District News https://remedii.net/women-using-cannabis-for-endometriosis-relief-bega-district-news/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 23:47:27 +0000 https://remedii.net/women-using-cannabis-for-endometriosis-relief-bega-district-news/ news, latest news Almost three-quarters of Australian women with endometriosis surveyed in a new study illicitly use cannabis to relieve painful symptoms, although they can potentially access legal medicinal cannabis through a doctor. Researchers at Western Sydney University interviewed women with endometriosis in New Zealand and Australia, where 72% of those surveyed reported illicitly self-administering […]]]>

news, latest news

Almost three-quarters of Australian women with endometriosis surveyed in a new study illicitly use cannabis to relieve painful symptoms, although they can potentially access legal medicinal cannabis through a doctor. Researchers at Western Sydney University interviewed women with endometriosis in New Zealand and Australia, where 72% of those surveyed reported illicitly self-administering cannabis. Women have reported positive results using cannabis to manage the often painful condition, in which tissue similar to that lining the uterus grows beyond it, causing inflammation and scarring. It is estimated that one in nine Australians suffers from endometriosis. According to the study published in the journal Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research, only 23% of 186 Australian respondents had access to cannabis on prescription from a doctor. Medicinal cannabis was approved for use in Australia in 2016. The Therapeutic Goods Administration said the majority of patients seeking medicinal cannabis do so for pain management, but the evidence for many painful conditions is still limited. . The administration does not consider medical cannabis to be a “first-line treatment” for any disease, which means that other treatments should be considered first. Australian Natural Therapeutics Group scientific director and lead author Justin Sinclair said there was still a stigma around medical cannabis and he was concerned that people would use cannabis without medical supervision. “A number of factors including concerns about possible legal repercussions, the judgment of their doctor or the company, or the alleged refusal of their doctors to prescribe legal medicinal cannabis were the main reasons they did not. haven’t spoken to their doctor, ”Sinclair said. “Improving communication between physicians and patients on the use of medicinal cannabis can improve levels of medical surveillance, the preference for legal adoption of medicinal cannabis over acquisition through illicit procurement and reduce the associated stigma. to cannabis. Mr Sinclair said “on a positive note” that almost all Australian respondents said they would continue to use cannabis because it provided better pain relief than current treatments. Associated Australian Press

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Clark County Seeks Comments on Cannabis Salon Regulation, Unveils Possible Rules | News https://remedii.net/clark-county-seeks-comments-on-cannabis-salon-regulation-unveils-possible-rules-news/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 04:59:00 +0000 https://remedii.net/clark-county-seeks-comments-on-cannabis-salon-regulation-unveils-possible-rules-news/ LAS VEGAS (FOX5) – Clark County officials are seeking feedback from businesses and the public. What should the regulations for cannabis salons contain? Getty Images More than 20 salons could arrive in Las Vegas. The Nevada legislature has given the green light to launch the shows in mid-2022, and Clark County must establish its own […]]]>

LAS VEGAS (FOX5) – Clark County officials are seeking feedback from businesses and the public. What should the regulations for cannabis salons contain?









More than 20 salons could arrive in Las Vegas. The Nevada legislature has given the green light to launch the shows in mid-2022, and Clark County must establish its own regulations.

Clark County will hold hearings from February 2022 and open them to businesses and the public.

Some possible rules to consider, according to Clark County officials at the last commissioners meeting:

  • THC limits per pack
  • Designated smoking areas
  • Areas designated for the consumption of edible products
  • Control of odors that float outside the premises
  • Consumption visibility limits from the outside

Very strict training and safety will be required for each operation.

Commissioner Tick Segerblom said the right regulations and the customer experience are key to attracting tourists and helping businesses generate profits.

“We don’t want to over-regulate… let companies do what they do,” he said. “We are on the new frontier again… we have the opportunity to be seen as a pioneer. This will prepare us for the future,” Segerblom said.

Segerblom said a key goal will be to encourage cannabis consumers to consume in salons.

Tourists on the Strip have a tough time. Hotels prohibit smoking in their premises and hotel rooms, but may not smoke in dispensaries.

“There is a huge concern about tourists outside on the Strip who smoke and impact others. They don’t want to spend a fortune to have to use something when they just can. go out the door, ”Segerblom said.

Source CEO Simon Nankervis said concerns about the restrictions are preventing customers from enjoying a salon experience.

“Most of the customers we spoke to are looking for a place to socialize with their friends, without having to buy and consume in large quantities. They’re looking for [the environment] to be relaxed, “Nankervis said, saying mood is the key to removing the stigma surrounding cannabis.” Coming out of the last few years, we’re trying to figure out what social life is like? ” he declares.

Nankervis is hoping the regulations won’t be burdensome on new businesses, launching an unknown company in the state.

“We have a lot of compliance in place,” Nankervis said.


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Cannabis Workers at St. Louis Medical Marijuana Dispensary Run for Union Elections | Marijuana https://remedii.net/cannabis-workers-at-st-louis-medical-marijuana-dispensary-run-for-union-elections-marijuana/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 21:30:00 +0000 https://remedii.net/cannabis-workers-at-st-louis-medical-marijuana-dispensary-run-for-union-elections-marijuana/ JEFFERSON CITY – Workers at a St. Louis medical marijuana dispensary seek to organize in what a union official says may be the first representation election involving workers in the legal cannabis industry in the United States. Missouri. Bernadette Faure, product specialist at Swade Cannabis in the Grove, said following an organizing campaign, workers on […]]]>

JEFFERSON CITY – Workers at a St. Louis medical marijuana dispensary seek to organize in what a union official says may be the first representation election involving workers in the legal cannabis industry in the United States. Missouri.

Bernadette Faure, product specialist at Swade Cannabis in the Grove, said following an organizing campaign, workers on Thursday submitted a petition for a union election to the company’s management and the National Council of Labor. labor relations.

An election administered by the NLRB typically takes place within 45 days, said Collin Reischman, spokesperson for United Food and Commercial Workers Local 655, which seeks to represent workers in negotiations.

Faure said six product specialists are part of the proposed bargaining unit.

She said employees did not receive a response from management on Thursday afternoon. Swade is a brand of Beleaf Co., based in Earth City.

The company did not immediately respond to an email on Thursday. A spokesperson for the NLRB also did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

“We are really presenting this as an opportunity for the company to hold on to us for the long term,” Faure said. “We love our jobs and we want to secure them for the future, but we want it to be through a contractual agreement that we have in writing and which cannot be changed without our permission.”


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Hinsdale venture gears up to turn former mink farm into indoor cannabis cultivation | Central Berkshires https://remedii.net/hinsdale-venture-gears-up-to-turn-former-mink-farm-into-indoor-cannabis-cultivation-central-berkshires/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 21:30:00 +0000 https://remedii.net/hinsdale-venture-gears-up-to-turn-former-mink-farm-into-indoor-cannabis-cultivation-central-berkshires/ Sunlight Farms LLC is proposing to establish an indoor cannabis farm at this location at 172 Peru Road in Hinsdale. GOOGLE EARTH HINSDALE – A joint venture involving Silver Therapeutics, a cannabis company with operations in Williamstown and Orange, is set to file an application to expand in a neighborhood in Hinsdale. Towards the end […]]]>






172 aerial Peru route.jpg

Sunlight Farms LLC is proposing to establish an indoor cannabis farm at this location at 172 Peru Road in Hinsdale.




HINSDALE – A joint venture involving Silver Therapeutics, a cannabis company with operations in Williamstown and Orange, is set to file an application to expand in a neighborhood in Hinsdale.

Towards the end of 2021, Sunlight Farms LLC sent the town a check for $ 15,000, as required by the host community agreement it made with Hinsdale last year. The money is a deposit required to cover consulting costs incurred by the city in evaluating the company’s proposal to build an indoor marijuana farm at 172 Peru Road.

The city’s deal with Sunlight Farms LLC was signed by Joshua Silver, who listed his establishment at 238 Main St. in Williamstown, where the Silver Therapeutics retail store is located.

“Mr. Silver is putting it forward,” said Bob Graves, the administrator for the city of Hinsdale.

Silver said on Tuesday that engineers are still working on detailed drawings of the project that will be submitted – and soon, he hopes. “Everything seems to be taking a lot longer these days,” he said. “When we met the select committee, we had [only] conceptual drawings. “

In December 2020, Silver offered to prepare a greenhouse of about 6,000 square feet at 172 Peru Road, which houses a former mink farm. He said at the time that he planned to use an existing structure on the property and use solar power available on the site.






Silver Therapeutics managers (copy)

Joshua Silver, right, joined colleagues in 2019 to mark the opening of their outlet in Williamstown. From left to right, Brendan McKee, CFO; Joshua Ferranto, COO; and Silver. A new joint venture between Silver Therapeutics and a Hinsdale landowner is proposing an indoor cannabis grow project at 172 Peru Road in Hinsdale.




That remains the plan, he said this week. An existing two-story warehouse with approximately 3,000 square feet of space would be reallocated to the greenhouse. The building is located at the back of a house on the site and was once used as part of the mink farm.

The project is a joint venture between Silver Therapeutics and owner Michael A. Viner, who has developed a solar field on the plot that the greenhouse plans to use as an energy source.

“It has the potential to have very low impacts,” Silver said, due to its use of solar power.

The city’s host community agreement with Sunlight Farms provides for a Level II farm under Cannabis Control Board rules, which would allow the company to build 6,800 square feet of grow space in interior, plus an additional 2,400 square feet of processing and storage space.

Silver said the company plans to submit its candidacy for the Hinsdale farm to the commission this month. There would be no retail sales on the property. All cannabis products would be sold through Silver Therapeutics outlets or the wholesale market.

The property is owned by Global Construction Services LLC, the principal of which is Viner of Hinsdale. Records filed with the Secretary of State’s office indicate that Silver and Viner are co-managers of Sunlight Farms.

Graves said the city expects to receive an application for a special permit for the farm which will be considered by the planning council. Silver said he didn’t know when the application would be filed, but said he hoped it would be submitted in the first quarter of the year.

Land records show that Viner purchased the 172 Peru Road property for $ 250,000 in July 2017 from Earl Carmel Trust.

If the project receives city approvals, it will pay Hinsdale 3 percent of its gross sales, in quarterly installments, as agreed by the host community. This pact would be renegotiated in five years; if the parties could not agree on the changes, it would remain in effect.

Pot trade explodes in Williamstown as more stores plan to open

The company also pledges to donate $ 2,500 per year for five years as a “community benefit” and to donate $ 2,500 annually to a local charity, for the duration of the l ‘agreement with the host community.

The document required Sunlight Farms to deposit $ 15,000 with the city before any expenses incurred by Hinsdale during the review of the cannabis project application.

Outdoor cultivation is prohibited, except with the consent of the Board of Directors.

Other provisions of the agreement require the company to consult with local law enforcement officials on the property’s security system and policies and to do its best to do business with local suppliers and hire locally.

The agreement also states that if at least five “reasonable complaints” are made about farm smells, the board can call the parties to a meeting to discuss the matter.

Hinsdale neighborhood faces new cannabis cultivation proposition

This isn’t the first time that a cannabis business has been launched for the neighborhood, near Lake Ashmere in the northeastern part of Hinsdale. Before meeting and ultimately bowing to neighborhood opposition, FFD Enterprises MA proposed an outdoor cannabis farm at 246 Peru Road.

This company chose to move its location to 120 Bullards Crossing Road, where it harvested its first harvest in 2021.


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Brighton and Hove News »Cannabis farm discovered in Brighton https://remedii.net/brighton-and-hove-news-cannabis-farm-discovered-in-brighton/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 18:28:00 +0000 https://remedii.net/brighton-and-hove-news-cannabis-farm-discovered-in-brighton/ A cannabis farm has been discovered in a disused building on a busy road in Preston village, Brighton. Stanford House in the village of Preston in Brighton A crop worth tens of thousands had been gathered from the building – Stanford House – which was built in 1908 and served as the home of the […]]]>

A cannabis farm has been discovered in a disused building on a busy road in Preston village, Brighton.

Stanford House in the village of Preston in Brighton

A crop worth tens of thousands had been gathered from the building – Stanford House – which was built in 1908 and served as the home of the Preston Club.

Sussex Police said: ‘Police are investigating after the discovery of a large scale cannabis cultivation facility in Brighton.

“On Thursday 30 December, police responded to a report of suspicious activity at a disused building, Stanford House, in South Road, Brighton.

“Inside the building, they found a large commercial cannabis ‘factory’ that had been recently harvested, with the cannabis drying out and awaiting further preparation.

“The estimated market value of the crop is in the range of £ 45,000 to £ 65,000.

“Commercial cannabis sites like this are often closely linked to organized crime, including modern slavery and human trafficking.

“Although no arrests have yet been made, a full investigation is underway to identify those involved.”

Detective Sergeant Chris Lane said: ‘We would particularly like to speak to anyone who has traveled in a vehicle equipped with a dashcam along South Road, Brighton, between 7.40 am and 8.20 am on Thursday, December 30, as they may have captured inadvertently providing evidence relevant to the investigation.

“If you can help us with any information, please contact us online or by calling 101, citing serial number 373 as of 12/30.”


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POSIBL wants to be the “cannabis farm of the future” https://remedii.net/posibl-wants-to-be-the-cannabis-farm-of-the-future/ Sat, 01 Jan 2022 03:05:50 +0000 https://remedii.net/posibl-wants-to-be-the-cannabis-farm-of-the-future/ POSIBL Smart Greenhouses at work Ben Lalande As the end of 2021 hurts the entire California cannabis industry, thanks to a glut of wholesale flower supplies and an increased cultivation tax coming in 2022, among other issues, the future of the industry is on everyone’s mind. POSIBL, based in Monterey, is a brand that resists […]]]>

As the end of 2021 hurts the entire California cannabis industry, thanks to a glut of wholesale flower supplies and an increased cultivation tax coming in 2022, among other issues, the future of the industry is on everyone’s mind.

POSIBL, based in Monterey, is a brand that resists the storm. The company has made its mark in the California industry by doing things a little differently: the company uses proprietary technology to build its greenhouses, which produce organic cannabis flowers at cost price, offering a sustainable, ethical and sustainable option. safe. high quality consumers with year round harvests. POSIBL’s smart greenhouses use best-in-class climate control, require less water per pound of flower, and are three times more energy efficient than indoor growers. The company sells under its own brand, as well as white labels for other brands.

I caught up with CEO Jesus Burrola, who leads the organization’s growth strategy in sales and operations, to learn more about what the company is and what it has in store for the future. . . Prior to POSIBL, he worked for 15 years at Beacon Building Products, the largest publicly traded building materials distributor in North America.

Why is POSIBL the cannabis farm of the future?

Jesus burrola: POSIBL creates the farm of the future by building high-tech greenhouses, as well as the way our company strives to provide personalized solutions to brands. We innovate with a state-of-the-art greenhouse that incorporates the most advanced technology in agriculture, allowing us to do more with less. This technology includes LED lighting, electric cogeneration plant, water recirculation system, control automation and the most efficient AI crop visibility technology. We believe that with the right technology, you can grow quality cannabis indoors in a much more sustainable and profitable way. This ultimately means better quality at lower prices for the end consumer.

You are passionate about sustainable development. What measures are taken by POSIBL to be sustainable?

JB: Our goal is to grow the perfect flower all year round in a sustainable manner. Most consumers don’t realize the very high carbon footprint of flowers grown indoors. It is estimated that one pound of indoor flowers has the equivalent carbon footprint of driving 8 times from the west coast to the east coast. An indoor environment does not use any element of the natural environment, so conditions are created through the use of equipment that uses a large amount of energy. In a greenhouse, for example, you maximize natural sunlight and supplement only enough to achieve ideal levels; and by recirculating the water, you are actually reusing the same water multiple times. One of the very interesting ideas that we have used is the use of a cogeneration plant for energy from natural gas on site. When natural gas is burned, it creates CO2, which in turn is what plants need and ends up being converted back to oxygen through photosynthesis.

Let’s talk about genetics! What are the unique varieties that you bring to the CA market? Tell us about your relationship with ranchers and what it means to do large-scale crafts?

JB: There are two recent projects that fascinate me. Firstly, Sativa Preservation Society, through a collaboration with Space Coyote, is a project to preserve some of the legendary fundamental sativa strains that are lost due to crossing with strains that are easier to grow, harvest faster and have more THC. . Indica. We’ve grown three Haze strains – Cuban Black Haze, A5 Haze, and C5 Haze – and these are 12-14 week old strains that you can’t find on the market with an incredible energizing high. We are very happy to work with a brand like Space Coyote that cares about educating the consumer and preserving these important strains, as well as breeders Skunktek and J-Trees who made this project possible. We are delighted that people are experimenting with these magical strains.

The second project is a collaboration with MeanGene from Freeborn Selections. We’re helping market his legendary Root Beer, a strain that has become an urban legend among cannabis connoisseurs. There is a tremendous amount of curiosity as very few people have ever smoked it, but the reviews on this flower are exceptional and we are proud to partner with MeneGene to produce it on a large scale and finally put it in the hands of the consumer.

These two projects share a common theme of partnering with incredible long-time breeders and providing a channel to the large-scale legal market through a partnership with POSIBL and the brands we work with. This is the key vision of what POSIBL is.

What advice would you give to someone who wants to start a cannabis brand but doesn’t know how to go about it?

JB: There is a way forward and an already built supply chain they can build on, as well as an alternate path that simplifies licensing requirements. Just like a beverage brand doesn’t have to reinvent the wheel and buy a sugarcane farm, you can successfully launch a cannabis brand in California by partnering with a dedicated B2B producer and conditioner who understands the technical aspects of genetics, large-scale cultivation, processing, testing and packaging. We work closely with several successful light asset brands that focus on their branding expertise, while leveraging specialist partners throughout the supply chain. The goal is to focus on the area where you can add the most value to the consumer.

Jesus, how have your previous experiences prepared you for the cannabis industry?

JB: My previous experience was as a distributor with small and large entrepreneurs. As a distributor who supplied the exact products like the competition, the only real differences were good service and good relationships. In the construction industry, things rarely go as planned, so the ability to solve problems, be resourceful, and have strong relationships built on trust separate the good from the bad distributors. It is no different in cannabis, there is no shortage of good cannabis in the market, but being able to ensure consistency, provide visibility of production, solve problems and work with. brands as a partner to help them succeed in the market is what separates us from most producers.

You recently hosted a Cannabis Investor Summit in Monterey and a tour of your Salinas campus. Tell us about the summit and the main lessons from the event.

JB: Our recent investor summit was a huge success. The aim was to educate investors on the challenges and opportunities of cannabis, to introduce our shareholders to our partners and to provide networking opportunities to everyone involved and to discuss our vision for evolution. of this industry. The legal cannabis industry is still in its infancy and there is no guide for the best way forward, especially with the ever-changing legal challenges and hurdles. We believe that by bringing together producers, brands, distributors, suppliers of genetic products, regulators, investors and other stakeholders in one room to discuss their challenges and opportunities and share ideas, we can help shape the development of the industry. As pioneers of this new legal industry, we all have a huge responsibility to influence the future of cannabis, and our goal is to play a role in making it POSIBL.

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Cannabis regulators step up recreation program under tight deadline | 406 Politics https://remedii.net/cannabis-regulators-step-up-recreation-program-under-tight-deadline-406-politics/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 13:00:00 +0000 https://remedii.net/cannabis-regulators-step-up-recreation-program-under-tight-deadline-406-politics/ Road to recreational cannabis After the medical marijuana industry took a winding road of regulatory reviews, federal raids and Supreme Court rulings, the Montanans began the next leg of the state’s journey when 58% of voters approved recreational cannabis in the 2020 election. For this seven-part series, Seaborn Larson and Thom Bridge of the Montana […]]]>

Rules or no rules, sales of recreational cannabis begin January 1 in Montana. And after nearly two decades of ramifications for poor regulations initially put in place for the medical marijuana industry, the Montana Department of Revenue wanted to get it right this time around – with just six months to get it all done.

The deadline created a pressure cooker environment, in which the department just finalized its last set of business rules on December 22, two weeks before sales start.

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“It’s going to be very tight,” Cannabis Control Division administrator Kristan Barbour said in an interview in November. “Our preference would be to set up this program with rules surrounding it, because it will go live (January 1) whether the rules are there or not.”

Voters made the Department of Revenue the new overseer of the state’s entire cannabis industry when they passed Initiative 190 in November 2020. The initiative set July 1 as the deadline for transfer Montana’s medical marijuana program, previously under the state Department of Health, to the Department of Revenue.

During the last semester of this year, the Barbour division expanded for the new recreational system while incorporating the medical program. While the lawmakers’ bill set the general framework for the state’s cannabis program, it was up to the revenue department to write specific rules to implement everything.

Preparing for the new market has meant balancing the intention of lawmakers with the response of industry when crafting these rules. Internally, the division has also developed its IT systems and tested its new licensing software, the nuts and bolts that will keep industry and government on the same page.

“Once we can trigger this and see what we’ve built, hopefully we can look back at the citizens of Montana and they say ‘I feel good voting for I-190’,” said Barbour.






Kristan Barbour, administrator of the Cannabis Control Division for the Department of Revenue, talks about the agency’s role in enforcing rules for the recreational cannabis industry in an interview in November.


THOM BRIDGE, Independent Disc


Suppliers who spoke to the Montana State News Bureau for this story said the last-second rule changes have created some uncertainty. But they appreciated the new division which has boots on the ground and was responsive to their feedback during the rule-making process, given the choppy waters the medical marijuana industry has endured over the course of time. of its 17 years of history.

Regulatory upheaval

Voters in Montana first approved medical marijuana in 2004. The market quickly turned into the Wild West, with little to no regulation from the state’s health department. In 2011, lawmakers – responding to federal raids on some state dispensaries – passed a law limiting providers to three patients, ending access to drugs for 93% of patients, and decimating the market across Montana. .

The state Supreme Court upheld the law in early 2016, but voters overturned it later that year with Initiative 182. In the years that followed, the state continued to elaborate further. of rules through the legislature and the Department of Public Health and Human Services, sometimes causing controversy in the industry.

Twenty-two full-time employees of the Department of Health’s former medical marijuana program migrated to the Department of Revenue when it took over in July. By mid-November, the Cannabis Control Division had hired 29 of its 34 full-time staff allocated by the legislature. And there are a lot of new faces in the division; a licensed technician has been part of the program since the emergence of the medical market, “but other than that there’s a lot of freshness,” said Barbour.






New State Inspectors for the Cannabis Control Division of the Montana Department of Revenue

New state inspectors for the Cannabis Control Division of the Montana Department of Revenue receive training from a representative of Metrc, the regulator’s tracking system for cannabis suppliers.


TOM KUGLIN, Independent Disc


“We are a number with a lot of different backgrounds coming from different directors and different subject matter experts,” said divisional assistant administrator Erin Ducharme. “We all get together and discuss how decisions are going to be made or the most important rules to follow when. It’s really a collaboration in our division based on the fact that we all come from so many different directions. . “

Behind the curtain of the Department of Revenue, much of the Cannabis Control Division’s efforts have focused on converting vendors to its new licensing system, a more centralized version of the device used by the Department of Health. of State. Bringing in this old data and moving hundreds of vendors, dispensaries, manufacturers, growers and labs to the new system is a difficult task in a short period of time, said management analyst Andrew Hoffman.






A Metrc label on a cannabis plant

A Metrc tag on a cannabis plant at Sacred Sun Farms outside of Bozeman.


THOM BRIDGE, Independent Disc


“We really work on behalf of (the vendors) and try to make this all work for everyone,” Hoffman said.

With all eyes on recreation, the Cannabis Control Division has identified 83 vendors who will remain medical when the clock turns to a new year. Devin Keller is a division supervising inspector who has been in regular contact with suppliers throughout the transition to Revenue Department oversight, and said he’s interested to see who decides to sell cannabis to companies. recreational or adult use and who decides to keep their business medical.

“Really, if they’re a former medical marijuana licensee in a ‘green’ county, the world is theirs when it comes to marijuana,” Keller said. “People who decide not to do it, it’s going to be interesting to see how it all goes.”

Rumble on the rules

In public view, the rule-making process has been risky. The revenue department has worked with sometimes conflicting information from the legislature and an industry that speaks out when regulations can make or break their livelihoods. In making rules, the ministry attempted to clarify things that were not defined in Bill 701, the comprehensive Cannabis Regulation Bill passed in the last session.

The industry strongly rejected the first parameters proposed on advertising. These suggested rules would have required all signage to be black and white and include a warning label in characters at least 10% of the largest font size, among other restrictions. The division, after an emphatic rebuke from producers in the public commentary, reduced many of those restrictions when the advertising regulations were finally passed.

Lawmakers have also banned recreational cannabis stores from selling hemp. By extension of the hemp ban, the Cannabis division released a proposed rule that bans dispensaries from selling cannabidiol products, most commonly a non-psychoactive component derived from hemp widely known as CBD. Lawmakers argued the rule strayed too far from legislative intent, but planned to clarify the matter with a follow-up bill in the 2023 session. As a result, the division was able to turn the tide and clarify that suppliers could still sell CBD products.

“Our rules have been quite controversial,” said Barbour. “And I think it’s only because there are so many. It’s not ideal for a state government to throw 15 rules in one package.… There are also loopholes in the draft. of Law 701.… Some of these unresolved details, we’re trying to answer. “

Lawmakers and vendors, however, praised Barbour and his team for staying fluent on a tight deadline with the information they had to work with.

“I was very impressed with DOR,” said Joanna Barney, general manager of Sacred Sun Farms at Four Corners, noting that several staff from the Cannabis Control Division had come to their facilities to hear them directly. . “They were extremely receptive to our comments.”






Marijuana plants grow in a grow room at Sacred Sun Farms

Marijuana plants in a Sacred Sun Farms grow room outside of Bozeman recently.


THOM BRIDGE, Independent Disc


It’s a different relationship than providers had with the state’s health department, said Barney, who has been given little power for much of his time regulating the industry to enforce laws. put in place by the legislature. Suppliers who operated non-compliant sometimes suffered no consequences, while others who operated within the rules paid huge costs, she said.

In the months after the Revenue Department took office, Barney remained involved in the rule-making process, just as she did during the session when lawmakers juggled three different bills on cannabis and dozens of amendments, sometimes voting on the whole, an unwieldy bunch in a day.

“The rule sets were a good reflection of what happened during the session,” said Barney. “It was a dense bill and a lot of changes to follow.”

The sheer volume of information in departmental legislation and rules explains how the state has grown along with industry since the federal raids about a decade ago. Barbour said that despite the sprint of the past six months, the division has the strength of its staff’s enthusiasm for the job.

“It’s a reward for the type of people that this program has attracted and who have been here kind of in the ditches as it has transformed over the years,” said Barbour. “There is nothing in marijuana that has remained stable… and I think that says a lot about their character of being flexible and fluid in this environment.”


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New Hampshire lawmakers introduce multiple marijuana legalization bills ahead of 2022 session https://remedii.net/new-hampshire-lawmakers-introduce-multiple-marijuana-legalization-bills-ahead-of-2022-session/ Tue, 28 Dec 2021 16:18:45 +0000 https://remedii.net/new-hampshire-lawmakers-introduce-multiple-marijuana-legalization-bills-ahead-of-2022-session/ The governor of Wisconsin announced Tuesday that he has granted 30 pardons, mostly to those convicted of non-violent marijuana or other drug-related offenses. This brings the total number of pardons issued so far by Governor Tony Evers (D) to 337 in his first three years in office, the most granted by a governor in state […]]]>

The governor of Wisconsin announced Tuesday that he has granted 30 pardons, mostly to those convicted of non-violent marijuana or other drug-related offenses.

This brings the total number of pardons issued so far by Governor Tony Evers (D) to 337 in his first three years in office, the most granted by a governor in state history at this point in time. ‘a first term. Advocates have urged state and federal executives to exercise this kind of authority, especially over cannabis cases, as more jurisdictions embrace legalization.

“I am proud of our work to give a second chance to people who have made amends and paid their debt to society,” Evers said in a press release. “These people have recognized and acknowledged their past mistakes, and it sends a powerful message of redemption as each of them strives to build a better and better future for themselves and their communities.”

Of the 30 cases pardoned Tuesday, 21 of them were related to the sale or possession of a controlled substance.

“Matthew Callaway was in his late teens when he sold marijuana to an officer 16 years ago,” reads the description of one case. “He resides in Colorado, where he aspires to be a firefighter. “

“Leon Howard was 19 when officers found marijuana in his home,” said another. “Living in Milwaukee, he supported his neighborhood by hosting block parties and street cleanups in addition to two jobs. “

Receiving a pardon does not mean that a person’s record is erased under Wisconsin law. Rather, it is an official act of forgiveness that restores rights such as being able to serve on a jury, hold public office or receive certain professional licenses. People can apply for clemency, and they are eligible for pardon if it has been at least five years since they served their sentence, with no other criminal charges pending.

Drug laws are particularly punitive in Wisconsin, where efforts to legalize marijuana, for example, have consistently stopped before the legislature despite the governor’s pushing for reform.

That said, there are lawmakers working to enact policy changes. Last month, two bipartisan lawmakers introduced a bill to decriminalize possession of low-strength marijuana. In August, three senators separately tabled legislation to legalize cannabis for adult use in the state.

As it stands, possession of marijuana is punishable by a fine of up to $ 1,000 and up to six months in jail for a first offense. Those convicted of a subsequent offense would face a felony charge punishable by a fine of up to $ 10,000 and up to three and a half years in prison.

Evers attempted to legalize recreational and medical marijuana as part of its state budget proposal earlier this year, but a GOP-led legislative committee removed the language of cannabis from the legislation in May. Democrats attempted to add the provisions through an amendment the following month, but Republicans blocked the decision.

Other Republican lawmakers have tabled bills to more modestly decriminalize marijuana possession in the state, but none of those proposals were brought forward in this year’s session.

Evers held a virtual town hall in April where he discussed his cannabis proposal, noting polls show Wisconsin residents support the policy change.

Locally, Wisconsin voters in three jurisdictions approved non-binding advisory questions in favor of legalizing marijuana last year. The measures came after Wisconsinites overwhelmingly embraced cannabis reform by supporting more than a dozen similar measures across the state in the 2018 election.

Late last year, city officials in the state capital Madison voted to remove most local penalties for possession and use of cannabis, allowing adult use of cannabis. 18 years and over.

But as lawmakers move to push forward a number of reform proposals in Badger State, there are still people facing the consequences of criminalization in the interim – and that’s where the graces executive can step in and help.

Evers may have set a pardons record in Wisconsin, but he’s not the only governor of the United States taking proactive steps to provide relief.

In May, the governor of Pennsylvania pardoned a doctor who was arrested, prosecuted and jailed for cultivating marijuana which he used to relieve his dying wife. This came months after he granted expedited pardons for minor cannabis offenses to 69 people.

Pennsylvania Lt. Gov. John Fetterman (D) recently said one of his main goals during his final year in office was to ensure that as many eligible people as possible submit applications for the courts are shutting down their cannabis records and re-establishing opportunities for things like housing, student financial aid, and employment.

After signing a bill to double the marijuana possession limit for adults in Colorado, Gov. Jared Polis (R) then asked state law enforcement to identify people who have already been sentenced for the new term he might be able to pardon.

Last year, the governor of Illinois announced more than 500,000 write-offs and pardons for those with minor marijuana-related offenses on their records. The massive leniency and record erasure sweep came about a year after the state’s legal cannabis market launched.

In June, more than 15,000 people convicted of low-level marijuana possession in Nevada were automatically pardoned under a resolution by the governor and Pardon Council commissioners.

Washington State Governor Jay Inslee (D) has also granted pardons for cannabis offenses.

At the federal level, President Joe Biden has come under pressure from numerous lawyers and lawmakers to use his executive power to provide assistance to those convicted of marijuana in their cases.

White House press secretary Jen Psaki said last week that the president had “every intention of using his clemency power,” but she declined to give details on when any action presidential election could actually take place.

“Biden must now rely on his executive authority. He’s delayed and underused it so far, ”Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) said last week, adding that he could use his authority to advance a number of progressive causes like marijuana reform.

The congresswoman was among the first to suggest that Biden use executive power to advance marijuana reform, joining 36 of her colleagues in a letter to the president in February imploring him to grant mass pardons to federally convicted of cannabis. Biden recently received a follow-up letter demanding a status update.

Last week, two Republican lawmakers sent Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris a separate letter criticizing their “lack of action” and “continued silence” on marijuana reform and urging the administration to reschedule the cannabis under federal law. They first applied in July.

These are just the latest examples of lawmakers submitting a demand for reform directly to the president, who has disappointed advocates in his first year in office by refusing to take meaningful steps to change the country’s approach to the government. cannabis despite a campaign for decriminalization and pro-rescheduling platforms.

Since the election, neither the president nor the vice president – who sponsored a legalization bill while in the Senate – have spoken of their cannabis campaign promises. And so far, the only pardons to come under the Biden administration have benefited turkeys at a Thanksgiving ceremony.

This is despite repeated calls from lawmakers and lawyers.

Last month, a group of senators separately sent a letter urging Biden to use his executive authority to grant a mass pardon to those convicted of non-violent marijuana.

Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-MA), who led the letter, said in a recent interview that Biden could boost the economy and promote racial fairness with a “stroke of the pen” in granting relief.

A recently released Congressional Research Service (CRS) report claimed the president had the power to grant mass pardons for cannabis-related offenses. He also said the administration can move to federal cannabis legalization without waiting for lawmakers to act.

Meanwhile, a group of more than 150 celebrities, athletes, politicians, law enforcement professionals and academics signed a letter that was delivered to Biden in September, urging him to grant a “full, complete and unconditional pardon.” to all people with non-violence. federal marijuana convictions.

Warren and Sen. Cory Booker (D-NJ) separately sent a letter to the Attorney General in October, arguing that the Justice Department should initiate a process to deprogram marijuana in order to “allow states to regulate cannabis like they see fit, begin to address the damage done by decades of racial disparities in cannabis law enforcement and facilitate valuable medical research.

The White House said in August that the president plans to use his executive authority to grant leniency to people with certain non-violent drug convictions.

In April, Psaki insisted on Biden’s pledge of leniency for people with federal marijuana and said the process would begin with a modest rescheduling of cannabis – a proposal that advocates say would not actually accomplish what she suggests.

New Hampshire lawmakers introduce multiple marijuana legalization bills ahead of 2022 session

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